chewink

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  • noun

Synonyms for chewink

common towhee of eastern North America

References in periodicals archive ?
The following nine species were present in the unburned site, yet were absent in the burned site: Black-and-white Warbler, Eastern Phoebe, Hairy Woodpecker, Northern Flicker, Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Eastern Towhee, Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis), Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedroruta), and Veery (Catharus fuscescens).
These included Northern Cardinal, American Goldfinch, Tufted Titmouse, Eastern Towhee, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, Common Grackle, and Black-capped Chickadee.
For example, use of habitat by Eastern Towhee seems characterized by avoidance of hardwood forests within our study site.
For the nests we monitored (see Tables 1 and 2), the following observations were at the edge of or beyond known egg or nestling dates for this region: 1) Sora nest with eggs on 23 July 2006; 2) Eastern Phoebe nest with eggs on 7 July 2006; 3) probable re-nest attempt for single-brooded Yellow-throated Vireo, with male and female pair observed making nest on 7 July 2006; and 4) nest with nestlings of Eastern Towhee on 7 September 2005 (Weeks 1994; Greenlaw 1996; Melvin and Gibbs 1996; Rodewald and James 1996).
2009) described a wild nest of a Wood Thrush that was attended by a male Eastern Towhee (Pipilo erythrophthalmus), but neither a wild Wood Thrush rearing heterospecific offspring, nor interspecific parental care at a wild nest of a Veery, have been reported.
Beyond that, in the disturbed area we would expect to see an increase in shrub land birds, like the chestnut-sided warbler, prairie warbler, brown thrasher, Eastern towhee - all species that benefit from the new forest growth.
1903-22 1965-87 Species (20) (23) Difference Killdeer 3-01 (20) 2-21 (21) -8 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 3-26 (20) 3-29 (21) +3 Eastern Phoebe 3-17 (18) 3-22 (22) +5 Ruby-crowned Kinglet 3-28 (20) 4-07 (22) +10 Eastern Bluebird 2-23 (17) 2-24 (22) +1 Hermit Thrush 3-31 (18) 4-08 (21) +8 Brown Thrasher 3-27 (19) 3-25 (22) -2 Eastern Towhee 3-11 (20) 3-14 (22) +3 Chipping Sparrow 3-23 (20) 4-04 (20) +12 Field Sparrow 3-22 (20) 3-17 (22) -5 Vesper Sparrow 3-28 (19) 4-03 (20) +6 Fox Sparrow 3-01 (20) 3-11 (21) +10 Swamp Sparrow 3-19 (20) 3-22 (20) +3 Red-winged Blackbird 3-06 (19) 2-20 (22) -14 Eastern Meadowlark 2-26 (20) 2-13 (17) -13 Rusty Blackbird 3-08 (19) 3-02 (16) -6 Brown-headed Cowbird 3-11 (19) 3-11 (21) +0 Table 2.
This team's discoveries included northern shoveler, turkey vulture, king eider, winter wren, eastern towhee and white-winged crossbills.
Model (a) K (b) n (c) RSS Eastern Towhee (Pipilo erythrophthalmus) Y = year 3 39 (714) 3,830.
The avian community associated with high severity burn units 1-2 years after fires was largely represented by early successional species including American Goldfinch (scientific names are in Table 1), Eastern Towhee, Indigo Bunting, and Eastern Wood-Pewee.
Eastern Towhee, Northern Cardinal, and Painted Bunting males had significantly higher densities in shrub than other habitats.
Secondary succession and maturation of forests have been cited as mechanisms driving long-term changes in populations of shrub specialists like the Eastern Towhee (Pipilo erythrophthalmus) (Hagan 1993) and species that prefer early-successional forest like the Least Flycatcher (Empidonax minimus) (Holmes and Sherry 1988).
We analyzed data for nests of six species: Chestnut-sided Warbler (n = 69, 55% success), Field Sparrow (n = 35, 40% success), Indigo Bunting (n = 29, 48% success), Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis, n = 11, 64% success), Common Yellowthroat ( Geothlypis trichas, n = 6, 17% success), and Eastern Towhee (Pipilo erythropthalmus, n = 4, 75% success).
Misdirected parental care has been described several times for the Eastern Towhee (Pipilo erythrophthalmus), but Wood Thrushes (Hylocichla mustelina) are not known to exhibit this behavior or cooperate as recipients of the behavior in the wild.
Major decreases (change >-50%) were observed in number of contacts of nine species, including Hairy Woodpecker (Picoides villosus), Pileated Woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus), Eastern Wood-Pewee (Contopus virens), Great Crested Flycatcher (Myiarchus crinitus), Wood Thrush, Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus), Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapillus), Eastern Towhee (Pipilo erythrophthalmus), and Indigo Bunting.
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