dreamland

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Synonyms for dreamland

land of make-believe

Synonyms

Synonyms for dreamland

a pleasing country existing only in dreams or imagination

References in classic literature ?
It is not much of a dream, considering the vast extent of the domains of dreamland, and their wonderful productions; it is only remarkable for being unusually restless and unusually real.
Penelope, who was sleeping sweetly at the gates of dreamland, answered, "Sister, why have you come here?
He was plunging into a beautiful dreamland when his ears caught a whisper, thin and sharp, above the monotonous babble round the fire.
Those words of Lydgate's were like a sad milestone marking how far he had travelled from his old dreamland, in which Rosamond Vincy appeared to be that perfect piece of womanhood who would reverence her husband's mind after the fashion of an accomplished mermaid, using her comb and looking-glass and singing her song for the relaxation of his adored wisdom alone.
 Why, back there in Dreamland, renewing his lease
With her chin propped on her hands and her eyes fixed on the blue glimpse of the Lake of Shining Waters that the west window afforded, she was far away in a gorgeous dreamland hearing and seeing nothing save her own wonderful visions.
And there we were, the four of us, upon the dreamland, the lost world, of Maple White.
Porter's two-minute film Coney Island at Night (1905), the Dreamlands amusement park is illuminated in the darkness, foregrounding the connection between the cinema and turn-of-the-century fairground entertainments as experiential technologies of shock and sensation.
Most of the work in Dreamlands challenges the idea that architecture is a lasting achievement while celebrating the transient in both man and his environment.
Dreamlands responds to JG Ballard's challenge of the endless leisure and frantic consumerism of Western spaces and mirrors the central theme of Jem Cohen's excellent 2004 film on shopping centres, Chain: no matter where you are in the world, the typology of these spaces adheres to the same function and aesthetic.
In these 19 essays, they and their contributors describe a number of neoliberal dreamlands from around the world and set them in context of wider social and political developments.
Last night I was e-mailed a link to the Dreamland skateparks web site, where it seems Mark "Red" Scott may have really "gleamed the cube" before Bob.