dream

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Synonyms for dream

have dreams

Synonyms

  • have dreams
  • have a dream
  • have nightmares
  • have a nightmare
  • hallucinate

daydream

Synonyms

  • daydream
  • be preoccupied
  • stare into space
  • be in a trance
  • be lost in thought
  • be in cloud-cuckoo-land
  • stargaze
  • be in a reverie
  • build castles in the air or in Spain

fantasy

dream of something or someone

Synonyms

  • daydream about
  • wish to
  • fantasize about
  • hope for
  • desire to
  • long for
  • aspire to
  • hunger for
  • hanker after
  • set your heart on

Synonyms for dream

a fantastic, impracticable plan or desire

a fervent hope, wish, or goal

to experience dreams or daydreams

to have a fervent hope or aspiration

Synonyms

dream up: to use ingenuity in making, developing, or achieving

Synonyms for dream

a series of mental images and emotions occurring during sleep

a cherished desire

a fantastic but vain hope (from fantasies induced by the opium pipe)

Synonyms

Related Words

a state of mind characterized by abstraction and release from reality

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someone or something wonderful

experience while sleeping

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References in periodicals archive ?
In order to clarify the relationship between Medea's dream and post-Homeric dream theory, I believe more attention should be paid to a broader philosophical development regarding the effect of the irrational passions more generally on prophetic dreaming.
All that classical and medieval dream theory can tell us is how, if Callisto did dream the first scene, his dream was caused.
Some surprising gaps in the existing work on Elizabethan fiction are also filled by bringing the insights of Renaissance drama scholarship to bear on fictional prose: Derek Alwes's 'Elizabethan Dreaming: Fictional Dreams from Gascoigne to Lodge' reads literary dreams through the glass of dream theory, and Walter Davis seeks to recapture the voices of the 'silenced women' in Elizabethan fiction.
If Freud only knew: A reconsideration of psychoanalytic dream theory.
In prefatory chapters Minnis places Chaucer and his poetry within the milieu of the court, then relates the love-vision form, useful for exploiting the traditions of fin'amors, to medieval dream theory.
After considering and discarding dream theory, Julia Kristeva's conception of female hysteria, Catholic tradition, and mother-daughter relationships as potential interpretive frameworks within which to analyze Tabor's "apparently mad and hysterical texts," Temple concludes that marvelous realism offers the most comprehensive explanation of Tabor's "attempts to transcript the unreal onto real paper, if even in fragments so symbolic of the everfragmentary ability to represent the interior of the self.
Yet there are important connections between memory and dreams, and an examination of medieval dream theory in the light of ambiguities of memory might suggest some avenues by which these divergent voices can be harmonized.
Although Kruger does not make the argument, the evidence of Dreaming in the Middle Ages could be taken to contradict these revisionist efforts, for it traces a tiresome history of mediaeval subservience to a handful of earlier sources on dream theory.
It is remarkable to consider that dream theory, as a form of cultural hegemony, has dominated the analytic scene in Native American studies until only very recently.