draughtsman

(redirected from Draughtsmanship)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Draughtsmanship: draftsmanship, Draftsmen
  • noun

Synonyms for draughtsman

a skilled worker who draws plans of buildings or machines

References in periodicals archive ?
But in the most distinguished of his more complex paintings, symbolism and draughtsmanship work in harmony.
Moreover, the outlines of the garments have a nervous energy lacking in Jyotirindranath's draughtsmanship which is more disciplined and sensitive.
When it comes to patterns, Wilhelm sees a return to old-style draughtsmanship with intricate floral motifs, alongside a design trend she dubs "supranatural", a kind of high-tech take on the living world, whether insects or leaf shapes.
Freud demonstrated that outstanding figurative painting is the work of the human imagination as well as technical skill in draughtsmanship.
When Peter returned to the UK he took several courses in technical illustration, engineering draughtsmanship and mechanical engineering, joining the IED along the way.
The artist's draughtsmanship and mastery of the medium are evident throughout the 39 pieces which he used to illustrate six fairy tales from the Brothers Grimm.
A childhood gift for draughtsmanship secured her a scholarship to Chelsea School of Art.
I believe that all great artists can draw, and the quality of Ruth's less well known graphic work and draughtsmanship is remarkable.
Given your reverence for the classical traditions of Western art, your respect to the sacramental and liturgical traditions of Roman Catholicism and the emphasis in your own work on representational draughtsmanship how would you explain your enthusiasm for artists such as those mentioned, who seem far removed from these concerns?
The United States and the EU are now struggling to cope with the result of the draughtsmanship at Dayton.
The plans, which may have been drawn by Tommy Kennedy, were works of art and displayed draughtsmanship of the highest order.
Draughtsmanship skills were easily attainable through the schools of the time, as for instance the Art Students League, whose major instructor, Robert Henri, exhorted his students to capture directly the plethora of New York scenes around them; Coppel notes, "his [Henri's] espousal of an art for life's sake was a direct reaction to the prevailing aesthetic of art for art's sake initially propounded by Whistler and perpetuated by his acolytes.
These are among the 'riskiest' works in the show - this may explain why they have been given the least auspicious viewing space (a corridor) - because they are computer-generated and thereby do not share the onus on draughtsmanship of calligraphers past.
The achievement is particularly telling in the case of the drawings, which are frequently accompanied by enlarged details that convey the finer points of Bruegel's draughtsmanship.
Gurney was not content with short-cuts in draughtsmanship.