downdraft

(redirected from Downdrafts)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
  • noun

Words related to downdraft

a strong downward air current

Related Words

References in periodicals archive ?
Though powerful, the Cattura downdraft is up to 35 percent quieter than other downdrafts in the market.
In addition to the downdrafts, air pockets that can pull a plane suddenly downward, causing turbulence, the NTSB said that high-density altitude and mountainous terrain contributed to the accident.
Tornado Touchdown: Scientists think downdrafts of cooled air yank the swirling mesocyclone toward the ground, At the same time, updrafts stretch the whirlwind vertically, speeding it up and tightening it into a narrow and violent tornado.
They are small-scale, intense downdrafts that, upon reaching the surface, spread outward in all directions.
Direxion Funds currently offer 34 mutual funds that may provide advisors with opportunities to magnify returns and protect against market downdrafts.
Though some scientists had suggested that air might sink inside large tornadoes, they did not suspect downdrafts of such force.
The antenna system, located at the airport, consists of a phased array used to detect downdrafts and a planar antenna for detecting surface windshear.
The list of winners this month is far shorter than Manera and his team have become accustomed to, as many of their holdings struggled to resist the market downdrafts.
Microbursts are violent downdrafts of air that are especially dangerous to aircraft during takeoffs and landings.
AIR's enhanced implementation of NWP effectively captures fronts, gravity waves, thunderstorm downdrafts and other substructures embedded in these storms.
Although the S&P 500 has experienced four sharp downdrafts during the 1990's, many growth industries have had many more corrections.
One to eight players can choose from three customizable planes and face realistic weather challenges, including crosswinds, downdrafts and obstacles, on nine beautifully rendered 3-D racecourses.
The airborne weather radar can detect and warn pilots of sudden and violent downdrafts, or wind shear, in sufficient time for flight crews to avoid the hazard.
High-velocity dimple jets direct air flow parallel to the ceiling, preventing cold air downdrafts.