Dostoevskian


Also found in: Dictionary.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • adj

Synonyms for Dostoevskian

of or relating to or in the style of Feodor Dostoevski

References in periodicals archive ?
what is uncanny in the experience of the Dostoevskian double becomes
It also shows that the Dostoevskian polyphonic hero is self-conscious, that is, he not only responds to the Other but also answers himself.
Black swans, chaos theories, Nessim's fragile worlds, the oscillations of risk, the steepness of volatility curves, the Dostoevskian crime and punishment in emerging markets (think Yukos/Rosneft, Mubarak era Egyptian property deals, Iran/money laundering sanctions on London banks).
At first blush, David Foster Wallace's fiction appears similar to this Dostoevskian model, with Wallace's characters shown to be prone to internal division and constantly engaged in dialogue with themselves and others.
That was the Dostoevskian twist to the whole thing.
The she-devil and barbarian Madame Chauchat doubles as an advocate for humanity, teaching Hans Castorp a Dostoevskian lesson.
Petersburg, appointment as the youngest faculty to the Moscow Conservatory, alcoholic anguish, binge drinking and gambling in Dostoevskian proportions, frolic in Nice, early death from TB or excess in Finland.
Yet from Polanyi's perspective, the process of "hollowing out" politics has the effect of narrowing the scope of authentically free and creative human interaction, which in turn translates into an impoverished and "ant hill" type of existence--to borrow a Dostoevskian term.
In a very different mode from earlier Dostoevskian dialogism, we see Woolf engaging with multiple points of view, poised feeling and the understated hum of life.
It may be a matter of Dostoevskian "polyphony," the unresolved plurality of voices allowed expression in the text; or, say, of the extraordinary double vision of Dickens' Bleak House, with its alternation between not only narrators but tenses, a "resolved" narrative in the past tense and a wholly unresolved and unhealed authorial present tense; or of the unreliable narrators of late twentieth century fiction, the shifting lights of Ian McEwan's Atonement, for example; or of Robinson's careful delineation of the diverse ironies of Lila and Jack.
He creates spec scripts for legendary director Lewis Milestone and lunches with William Saroyan (near the end of his life when Yoram encounters him, and a Dostoevskian shipwreck of a man).
In The Secret Agent, Conrad imports Dostoevskian anarchists preoccupied with Nietzschean philosophical musings into a dark and brooding variation of Dickens's London to create an impressive creative synthesis.
Brenneman watching Love Boat while the state floods) Dostoevskian drama (she wins a large sum gambling after the fateful words Rien ne va plusall bets are offare spoken) horror (a graphic third-trimester abortion) and the most radical of subjectivities by a woman protagonist meld together only to disappear.
My argument here is that in addition to announcing his seriousness of purpose and his ambitions for the novel, Mailer's implementation of a Dostoevskian supertext in Dream works as a productive stratagem, for it induces us to examine the questions Mailer raises in Dream in a double light, one that reflects back on Crime.
The most significant omission, to my mind, would seem to be a detailed discussion of the term 'scandal', chosen for the title and described in the introduction as having a 'multi-layered meaning' and a 'gamut of interlocking connotations' in the Dostoevskian world (p.