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In The Brothers Karamazov, Fyodor Dostoevski states that "the earth is soaked from its crust to its very centre with the tears of humanity".
Perhaps morality is essentially dependent upon God so that, for example, duties or laws depend upon a Lawgiver, and rights are granted to us by our Creator, but Dostoevski may have had something different in mind.
Instead the priest points to local concerts with top-flight performers, to well-schooled, broadly experienced professionals and to fishermen who read Dickens, Tolstoy and Dostoevski.
2) Scorsese recalls, "I felt close to the character by way of Dostoevski.
Nishitani looks for the "theology of history" of Niebuhr and Hromadka as it emerges in their encounter with various facets of "communism", including its theoretical foundations, its 19th century ancestry in the "passionate humanism" of Russian writers like Dostoevski, Turgenev and Gogol (in Hromadka's view), and in its expressions in movements, primarily Soviet communism.
One has read and re-reads Nietzsche, Dostoevski, and even Frankl.
A contemporary of Dostoevski and Tolstoy, Leskow's religious vision probably led him to write less panoramic and more narrowly focused stories than did his more famous contemporaries; hence, he never achieved their universal appeal.
Perhaps, thought B, it really was a Dostoevski story he had been thinking of.
More than a century ago, the revered Russian writer, Feodor Dostoevski, said: Neither man nor nation can exist without a sublime idea.
In a sense, Just, like the best modern novelists-Anne Tyler, Phillip Roth, Raymond Carver, and a substa >;ntial handful of others-is descended not from Dickens but from Dostoevski.
Irving Kristol recalls Strauss making a similar point in this way: "Strauss, in conversation, once remarked that it was entirely proper for a young man to think Dostoevski was the greatest novelist, but it would be a sign of maturity when he later concluded it was Jane Austen who had the most legitimate claim to that place.
In Tropic of Cancer, Miller--whose first forays into the novel, Moloch, or This Gentile World and Crazy Cock (both published posthumously), employ a stilted third-person perspective that borrows heavily from such European luminaries as Hamsun, Dostoevski, and Strindberg--ostensibly collapses the boundaries between his life and the life of his protagonist, Henry Miller.
Ralph Ellison and a Literary 'Ancestor': Dostoevski.
Freud, in a 1928 paper on Dostoevski, writes: "Before the problem of the creative artist analysis must, alas, lay down its arms" (my emphasis).
Dostoevski once said that it is the one question on which everything in the world depends.