Dorothy Hodgkin


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Synonyms for Dorothy Hodgkin

English chemist (born in Egypt) who used crystallography to study the structure of organic compounds (1910-1994)

References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Elena Turitsyna from the university's School of Engineering and Applied Science, was awarded the Dorothy Hodgkin Fellowship, which offers the first step to an independent research career.
Take Florence Nightingale (and Mary Seacole) in the Crimea; Amelia Earhart (and Amy Johnson) in aviation; scientists Marie Curie and Dorothy Hodgkin, Britain's first Nobel laureate; Nazi victim Anne Frank, Dian Fossey for her work with gorillas.
Very strongly recommended, The Learning Brain: Lessons For Education deftly co-authored by Sarah-Jayne Blakemore (Royal Society Dorothy Hodgkin Research Fellow, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College, London) and Uta Frith (Professor of Cognitive Development and Deputy Director of the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College, London) is an informed and informative body of work specifically designed to guide non-specialist general readers seeking learn more of how the mind works.
The British Nobel laureate Dorothy Hodgkin managed to have several children and become a leading X-ray crystallographer.
More than 120 researchers will work in the laboratories at Bristol University's Dorothy Hodgkin Building.
The stamp itself was a tribute to the late Professor Dorothy Hodgkin who had carried out many years of pioneering research work in England.
Other women to make the top 10 included the Queen and Queen Mother, Princess Diana, Florence Nightingale Mother Teresa, Mo Mowlam, and scientists Marie Curie, Dorothy Hodgkin and Marie Stopes.
The Queen Mother and Nobel prizewinning scientist Dorothy Hodgkin came joint ninth.
You will not find Jessica Tandy, Melina Mercouri (in either of her capacities as actress or government minister), Nobel Prize winner chemist Dorothy Hodgkin, multiple Olympic gold medallist Wilma Rudolph, actress Guilietta Masina (who does not appear even in the biography of her husband, Federico Fellini), or Jacqueline Kennedy (missing both as Kennedy and Onassis).
I knew Dorothy Hodgkin for the last twenty-eight years of her life and in this book I could detect occasional errors of fact and interpretation.