Dorothea Dix


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Synonyms for Dorothea Dix

United States social reformer who pioneered in the reform of prisons and in the treatment of the mentally ill

References in periodicals archive ?
Dorothea Dix, by contrast, sided with the Pennsylvania system.
To do otherwise is to perpetuate the kind of environment that Dorothea Dix spent her lifeblood trying to deal with in this commonwealth,'' he said.
4-5; http: / /bitly/F111012), I, too, was distressed to learn of Dorothea Dix Hospital's closing.
Often with little power or sway on their own, nurses--mostly women, historically--have been a force of will and a sense of common decency, and paved the way toward better care and a more compassionate society-from Clara Barton's treatment of wounded soldiers at Antietam, to the advocacy of Dorothea Dix on behalf of people with mental disabilities, to the countless nurses whose names we'll never know.
Often with little power or sway on their own, nurses--mostly women, historically--have been a force of will and a sense of common decency, and paved the way towards better care and a more compassionate society--from Clara Barton's treatment of wounded soldiers at Antietam, to the advocacy of Dorothea Dix on behalf of people with mental disabilities, to the countless nurses whose names we'll never know.
Salimi, associate director of the clinical research unit at Dorothea Dix Hospital in Raleigh, N.
Dorothea Dix, the social worker who forced the United States in the 19th century to release the mentally ill from prisons and provide them therapeutic care, would be thrilled to know that what she engendered, and what has been lost for so long, is coming back to life.
The mental hospital that Heard and Sedaris refer to is Dorothea Dix Hospital in Raleigh, N.
Northerners such as Dorothea Dix, the crusader for the reform of mental institutions and later superintendent of female nurses for the Union during the war; Harriet Beecher Stowe, the author of Uncle Tom's Cabin, whom President Lincoln called "the woman that wrote the book that caused this war"; Harriet Tubman, a runaway slave who helped operate the "underground railroad"; and many others enjoy excellent sidebar treatment too.
A bit more editorial pressure might have turned up sculptor Maya Lin, dancer Maria Tallchief, women's health advocate Margaret Sanger, TV producer Lucille Ball, astronaut Sally Ride, singer Marian Anderson, and federal appointee Dorothea Dix.
For example, one is devoted entirely to women political activists such as Dorothea Dix and Harriet Beecher Stowe.
Hancock came from a family of Quakers and, unlike Nightingale, never lacked familial backing, but she was almost felled at the first hurdle by Dorothea Dix, who had been appointed as superintendent of female nurses by the Union in June of 1861.
Dorothea Dix and Jane Addams stand out for their influential work during the period of dual federalism.
Unfortunately, the very demand for more public asylums ginned up by do-gooders like Dorothea Dix in the mid-19th century led to the medicalization and professionalization of mental institutions.
On June 10, 1861, less than 2 months after the War Between the States began, the Secretary of War appointed Dorothea Dix as Superintendent of Women Nurses for the Union Army with authority to select and assign women nurses to general and permanent military hospitals.