sovereign immunity

(redirected from Doctrine of sovereign immunity)
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Related to Doctrine of sovereign immunity: Act of State Doctrine
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  • noun

Words related to sovereign immunity

an exemption that precludes bringing a suit against the sovereign government without the government's consent

References in periodicals archive ?
This Article will lay out the origins of the doctrine of sovereign immunity and the preservation of the doctrine in the Constitution.
for harms it causes through the doctrine of sovereign immunity.
Circuit, the Circuit fielding the great majority of federal subpoenas against officers of the federal government as a consequence of the holding in Touhy, would endorse Frankfurter's logic strongly, (152) building on its body of cases assuming the nonapplicability of the doctrine of sovereign immunity to federal discovery and rejecting the argument as "attempting to graft onto discovery law a broad doctrine of sovereign immunity.
51) A decision contrary to that of the Ninth Circuit's risks transcending the boundaries of Congress and threatens the democratic process of policy decision-making--exactly what the doctrine of sovereign immunity aims to protect.
dissenting) ("[T]he doctrine of sovereign immunity is nothing but a judge-made rule.
First, this Part will explore the evolving doctrine of sovereign immunity in the U.
The ECSI does not give effect to the restrictive doctrine of sovereign immunity.
15) An examination of the workings of the oil Pollution Act and the doctrine of sovereign immunity will follow to highlight possible defense strategies of the defendants.
Alternatively, a court could rely on the doctrine of sovereign immunity.
49) In sum, as Laurence Tribe says, "the doctrine of sovereign immunity is in no danger of falling out of official favor any time soon.
The Rehnquist Court retracted from the exceptions to the doctrine of sovereign immunity that the Court had earlier set forth, thereby slowly shifting the balance more in the states' favor.
Supreme Court made exactly the latter argument to justify adherence to a doctrine of sovereign immunity in the absence of a statutory rule.
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