Dionysian

(redirected from Dionysiac)
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  • adj

Words related to Dionysian

of or relating to or worshipping Dionysus

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Cadmus and Tiresias come out dressed for Dionysiac worship, which they take very seriously--[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (we alone are in our right minds, the others are fools [196])--but which causes Pentheus to laugh and feel shame on his grandfather's behalf.
In the case of ancient dances, Marie-Helene Delavaud-Roux identifies a certain type of mannerism defining the masculine Dionysiac dance, performed by Komastes and satyrs, as shown in ceramic ornaments dating from the latter half of the fifth-century BC.
Nevertheless, from the permanence of reactive mystical tendencies in society, which have incessantly pointed toward the re-sacralization and re-energitization of the social body, a process of re-sacralization emerged earlier and between the wars, which escaped the "semantic" realm of technical and instrumental knowledge, implying an anti-functional movement toward the Dionysiac, orgiastic, irrational, and ecstatic; this release of a collective energetic surplus emerged as a reaction to an acute collective stress disorder.
their ears to every chorus at the Dionysiac, unfit to rule or figure
Although he resists a strict Kantian formalism, Grady is eager to distinguish his project from a more straightforward hermeneutics that rests upon a Nietzschian Apollonian / Dionysiac dialectic with its swings from emphasizing "order" to the more recent celebration of "disunity" "that has opened the text up to reveal its fissures, its faultlines, its 'other'" (3).
Above the hill, a curd in whey, The moon rides in the nether sky, Of Dionysiac poetry The Muse and mother; She chills and kindles with her eye My heart's blown feather.
9) Vittore Branca, one of the few scholars to mention possible sources for this scene, suggests a link with ancient Dionysiac rites as they are thought to be depicted in a fresco in Pompeii, which shows a female satyr nursing a baby goat.
17) Describing the modern sportswoman according to her Hellenic ancestor, Montherlant focused on female gymnasts who mimed the Dionysiac priestesses of Greek Mythology: they "implored the sun with classical movements of pagan votaries.
One may say that Dionysiac madness/insight is also the basis of mimetic art, enabling his adherents to see that which is not there and to be affected by or to refuse to suspend disbelief at the peril of losing themselves entirely to reality.
After the middle of the third century, the happy, joyful scenes with the dancing, singing and quaffing Dionysiac thiasoi, the beautiful Nereids and their doting sea-centaurs, and the images of the deceased in the form of star-crossed lovers from Greek mythology, almost completely vanish from Roman sarcophagi.
4), who is depicted as a religious ecstatic of the Dionysiac type (2.
He was supported by his lover, a Dionysiac priestess but eventually, he had to face his nemesis, the cruel, bloodthirsty general Crassus.
It is the Dionysiac sparagmos, which, as a political program, inevitably becomes a holocaust.
Its even longer "Variante" then humorously reasserts and expands upon both such a libidinous virile behavior and the apology of nakedness with the description of a Dionysiac, orgiastic scene set in the "postribolo piu frequentato," eventually culminating in a provocative, absurdiste manifesto "against clothing":
Limassol's carnival celebrations date back hundreds of years with their origins in Greek mythology and the Dionysiac festivals.