nitrogen

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Related to Dinitrogen: Dinitrogen oxide
  • noun

Synonyms for nitrogen

a common nonmetallic element that is normally a colorless odorless tasteless inert diatomic gas

References in periodicals archive ?
The agency has already been measuring dinitrogen monoxide, which is emitted through farming and chemical engineering activities, at Ofunato observatory, but it plans to monitor the gas on Minamitori Island as well.
Israel DW Symbiotic dinitrogen fixation and host-plant growth during development of and recovery from phosphorus deficiency.
In 1909, at the University of Karlsruhe in Germany, Fritz Haber showed how ammonia, the key nitrogen fertilizer, could be synthesised from dinitrogen [N.
Two of the strongest bonds in chemistry--in dinitrogen (Na) and carbon monoxide (CO) -have proven to be no match for chemists at Cornell University in New York.
Small molecules, such as dinitrogen and dioxygen, can be used as energy and signaling agents in biological systems.
pennsylvania tested negative for NA in Herrick Fen; however, this species is reported to fix dinitrogen elsewhere (Dudley and others, 1996).
Indoor ozone and nitrogen dioxide: a potential pathway to the generation of nitrate radicals, dinitrogen pentaoxide, and nitric acid indoors.
In their plan, air collected from the atmosphere through planes' jet engines for air conditioning goes through the analyzer, which measures the concentrations of greenhouse gases such as CO2, methane and dinitrogen monoxide.
The main reservoir of nitrogen is atmospheric dinitrogen, which is not available to plants directly, consequently nitrogen might be a limiting factor as well.
But nearly all of this atmospheric nitrogen is elemental dinitrogen, or [N.
Yet that freely circulating dinitrogen molecule is glued together by a triple bond that is nearly impossible to break, and it must be broken for atmospheric nitrogen to become available to living organisms.
Dinitrogen fixation by plant associations excluding legumes.
Objective: "The conversion of dinitrogen (N2) to ammonia (NH3) is of fundamental biological and economic importance.