diminutive

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Synonyms for diminutive

Synonyms for diminutive

Synonyms for diminutive

a word that is formed with a suffix (such as -let or -kin) to indicate smallness

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References in classic literature ?
Don't mention it to our diminutive friend when she comes in.
Diminutive footmarks, toes never fettered by boots, naked feet, stone-headed wooden mace, great agility, small poisoned darts.
Pondering upon the advisability of this step, and the sensation it was likely to create in the neighbourhood, Mr Kenwigs betook himself to the sitting-room, where various extremely diminutive articles of clothing were airing on a horse before the fire, and Mr Lumbey, the doctor, was dandling the baby--that is, the old baby--not the new one.
Colossal as these dimensions may appear, they were diminutive in comparison with the 10,000 foot telescope proposed by the astronomer Hooke only a few years ago!
While I thus stood, leaning on my gun, and looking up at the dark gables, sunk in an idle reverie, weaving a tissue of wayward fancies, in which old associations and the fair young hermit, now within those walls, bore a nearly equal part, I heard a slight rustling and scrambling just within the garden; and, glancing in the direction whence the sound proceeded, I beheld a tiny hand elevated above the wall: it clung to the topmost stone, and then another little hand was raised to take a firmer hold, and then appeared a small white forehead, surmounted with wreaths of light brown hair, with a pair of deep blue eyes beneath, and the upper portion of a diminutive ivory nose.
He had not gone more than a hundred yards towards the town when he slowed down, almost faltered in his walk, at the sight of a figure walking in the contrary direction, draped in a cloak, under a soft, broad-brimmed hat, picturesque but diminutive, as if seen through the big end of an opera-glass.
At closer quarters the diminutive personage looked like a reduction of an ordinary-sized man, with a lofty brow bared for a moment by the raising of the hat, the great pepper-and salt full beard spread over the proportionally broad chest.
He walked as if blind, following instinctively the shore of the diminutive harbour along the quay, through a pretty, dull garden, where dull people sat on chairs under the trees, till, his fury abandoning him, he discovered himself in the middle of a long, broad bridge.
Accordingly, all known diminutives are presumed to be stored in the mental lexicon as completely formed units with associative links to their base forms.
Diminutives express concepts such as familiarity, small size, and disdain (see Zuluaga 1993 for a discussion of the semantics of diminutives).
For example, Jaeggli (1980) discusses diminutives in Uruguayan Spanish from a classical generative standpoint, while Crowhurst (1992) and Prieto (1992) argue that they are to be dealt with in terms of prosodic constraints.
The purpose of the present paper, then, is to demonstrate that diminutive formation may be accounted for without recourse to highly abstract underlying representations, rules, or constraints, but by analogy to other fully specified pairs of bases and their corresponding diminutives in the mental lexicon.
It entails storage of fully specified pairs of bases and their corresponding diminutives, and a precise procedural algorithm for choosing the correct diminutive allomorph when the diminutive form is novel or temporarily inaccessible from memory.
Much is made of Belleau's "ubiquitous diminutives and present participles whose superabundance Weber describes caustically as 'la deformation mignarde'" (244).
She is also an exquisite dancer who can warm and fill the diminutives of baroque style.