gastric juice

(redirected from Digestive juices)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
  • noun

Synonyms for gastric juice

digestive secretions of the stomach glands consisting chiefly of hydrochloric acid and mucin and the enzymes pepsin and rennin and lipase

References in periodicals archive ?
Oils that stimulate the digestive juices are the most active ingredients of digestive herbs.
Caffeine increases secretions of saliva and digestive juices.
The team knew that caffeine was likely to stimulate tear glands, since it is known to increase other secretions, such as saliva and digestive juices.
According to studies, digestive juices released in the absence of food during fasting begin to break down and affect the lining of the stomach that can result in foul odour that smells like stale food.
If there is a weakening of this area, then it ceases to function properly and allows digestive juices to flow the wrong way.
But two days of denial, that too at a time when the digestive juices are working overtime, can drive any self-respecting Bong to near-lunacy.
He said that the laboratory artificial gut mimics the human stomach and small intestine with fake digestive juices added.
Until now the popular explanation has been that GERD develops as a direct result of acidic digestive juices burning the esophageal epithelial cells.
DIFFICULT TO DIAGNOSE The pancreas, located behind the stomach and shaped like a leaf, produces digestive juices as well as insulin to balance sugar levels in the blood.
If you drink a lot during your meal you're diluting your digestive juices and this hinders the digestive process," explains Andrea.
The nectar is spiked with a narcotic, so visitors - including flies, cockroaches or mice - soon feel giddy, lose their balance or footing and plunge into a vat of watery digestive juices where they drown.
The nectar is spiked with narcotic, so visitors - flies, cockroaches or mice - soon feel giddy, lose their balance or footing and plunge into a vat of watery digestive juices where they drown.
These multicoloured sacs of digestive juices trap passing cockroaches, mice and small mammals, which stand little chance of escape.
Once breached, the acid from the stomach, the digestive juices and bile from the liver can all irritate the exposed tissues and contribute to the development of a chronic peptic ulcer.