dietary supplement

(redirected from Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act)
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  • noun

Words related to dietary supplement

something added to complete a diet or to make up for a dietary deficiency

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Caveat Emptor, Buyer Beware: Deregulation of Dietary Supplements Upon Enactment of the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994.
The final blow to what little power the FDA still had over the dietary supplements industry came with the passage of the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 ("DSHEA").
Legal and easily obtainable, sport dietary supplements fall under the guidelines established by the 1994 US Congress when they passed the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA).
Fact: The Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA), enacted in 1994, gives considerable powers to the Federal government to assure the safety of dietary supplements as well as the accuracy of their claims and labeling.
High levels of naturally occurring minerals--silica and fluoride--have instead allowed the product to find a home as a dietary supplement under the 1997 Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act.
But supplement sales may have gotten their biggest boost from a 1994 law called the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA, pronounced Dee-SHAY).
Henney promised to reevaluate the proposed rule for implementation of the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994.
In 1994, Congress passed the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act, which effectively removed all regulation of this $12 billion-a-year industry.
Specifically, the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (DSHEA)(9) reaffirms that dietary supplements are to be classified as foods.
When the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (DSHEA) was passed, it was heralded as the harbinger of a golden eras - not only for health-minded consumers, but for food companies seeking a healthier share of market.
Congress defined the term "dietary supplement" in the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA) of 1994.
Under the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA), the manufacturer or distributor must notify the FDA at least 75 days before beginning to market a dietary supplement that contains a new dietary ingredient (one that was not marketed in the United States before Oct.
DDSP is the science and policy division created following passage of the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA) to handle enforcement decisions for the $35+ billion dietary supplement industry, as well as products illegally masquerading as dietary supplements.
The 1994 Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA) created a new regulatory approach for products that included herbal products, vitamins, and minerals.
According to the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA), a supplement cannot be "represented for use as a conventional food.