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  • noun

Synonyms for dialect

Synonyms for dialect

a variety of a language that differs from the standard form

a system of terms used by a people sharing a history and culture

specialized expressions indigenous to a particular field, subject, trade, or subculture

Synonyms for dialect

the usage or vocabulary that is characteristic of a specific group of people

References in classic literature ?
Hold it safe, father," the other answered, in the same soft, mincing dialect.
French, that dialect of it which was spoken by the Normans--Anglo-French (English-French) it has naturally come to be called--was of course introduced by the Conquest as the language of the governing and upper social class, and in it also during the next three or four centuries a considerable body of literature was produced.
You may start, Senor Jacinto," said the professor, and the guide called something in Indian dialect to the rowers.
You speak my dialect like a native, but you are not a Mexican Plug, you are a gentleman, I can see that; and educated, of course.
And possibly the raftsmen's dialect was what is called PLATT-DEUTSCH, and so they found his English more familiar to their ears than another man's German.
He could neither read nor write, and his speech was the basest dialect of the Negro quarter.
When he had identified these objects in what benighted mind he had, he said, in a dialect that was just intelligible:
Scottish manners, Scottish dialect, and Scottish characters of note, being those with which the author was most intimately, and familiarly acquainted, were the groundwork upon which he had hitherto relied for giving effect to his narrative.
At length one of them called out in a clear, polite, smooth dialect, not unlike in sound to the Italian: and therefore I returned an answer in that language, hoping at least that the cadence might be more agreeable to his ears.
I say nothing of the possible danger if a Woman should ever surreptitiously learn to read and convey to her Sex the result of her perusal of a single popular volume; nor of the possibility that the indiscretion or disobedience of some infant Male might reveal to a Mother the secrets of the logical dialect.
It was a sonorous, harmonious, and flexible dialect, the vowels seeming to admit of very varied accentuation.
But," said Grimaud, in the same silent dialect, "we shall leave our skins there.
He was to learn a dialect, in which he could be assisted by no affinity with the languages he already knew.
With how little propriety they are to be regarded as forming a separate group will be at once apparent, when it is considered that they lie in the immediate vicinity of the other islands, that is to say, less than a degree to the northwest of them; that their inhabitants speak the Marquesan dialect, and that their laws, religion, and general customs are identical.
To Lady Arabella it sounded mere gibberish, but it was in his own dialect, and meant love, marriage, wife.