Denmark Vesey

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  • noun

Synonyms for Denmark Vesey

United States freed slave and insurrectionist in South Carolina who was involved in planning an uprising of slaves and was hanged (1767-1822)


References in periodicals archive ?
Egerton, He Shall Go Free: The Lives of Denmark Vesey (Madison, Wise.
history of African Atlantic resistance to enslavement, Denmark Vesey.
53) Stuckey, Slave Culture, 48-49, as quoted in Egerton, He Shall Go Out Free, 113; Harding, "Religion and Resistance," 185; Lofton, Insurrection in South Carolina, 132-33; Robertson, Denmark Vesey, 9.
The Stono Rebellion of 1739 near Charleston; the Denmark Vesey insurrection in Charleston in 1822; Harriet Tubman's presence in and around Beaufort; the Civil War heroics of Black soldiers; the achievements of Dr.
The first of these, the abortive 1822 Denmark Vesey Conspiracy, is somewhat anomalous in that free Blacks played a significant role in formulating a plot to liberate the slave population of Charleston and the surrounding countryside.
He also appreciated Washington's work among rural blacks and understood his use of dissimulation in dealing with whites, even perhaps seeing him as another Denmark Vesey.
The number 23 is magical, but perhaps an historical event, namely the Denmark Vesey slave revolt which occurred in the Carolinas in 1822, had some bearing on her choice of year.
Consider what might occur from reading Arna Bontemps's Black Thunder (1936), Margaret Walker's Jubilee (1967), and John Oliver Killens's Great Gittin' Up Morning: The Story of Denmark Vesey (1972), against Alex Haley's Roots (1976), Gloria Naylor's Mama Day (1988), Sherley Anne Williams's Dessa Rose (1986), and Toni Morrison's Beloved (1987).
For instance, she notes that both the Nat Turner and Denmark Vesey slave revolts were fueled by magical practices--fascinating historical facts that resonate with numerous recent historical studies of the origins of the Haitian Revolution, and of indigenous and slave uprisings in colonial Latin America.
But in the mid-1950s the church revived a militant tradition, the tradition of Nat Turner, Denmark Vesey, Harriet Tubman, and Frederick Douglass.
Designs Against Charleston: The Trial Record of the Denmark Vesey Slave Conspiracy of 1822, edited with an introduction by Edward A.
It is noteworthy that even Denmark Vesey himself, "a free negro [sic], was arrested on the 21st, and on the 22nd put on his trial.
Egerton, He Shall Go Out Free: The Lives of Denmark Vesey (Madison, 1999), 128.
In the late 1920s "Negro Weeks" were launched by Briggs to celebrate revolutionary heroes such as Toussaint L'Ouverture and Denmark Vesey.
de Graaf, "[i]n January 1938, Juanita Hall conducted the Negro Melody Singers in an unstaged performance of the first act of Denmark Vesey for the New York Composer's Forum.