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  • noun

Synonyms for kelvin

the basic unit of thermodynamic temperature adopted under the Systeme International d'Unites


Related Words

British physicist who invented the Kelvin scale of temperature and pioneered undersea telegraphy (1824-1907)

References in periodicals archive ?
Bulbs with color temperatures between 3,000 and 6,500 degrees Kelvin all have been shown to be effective.
Top right: An active region of the sun on a quiet day: gas at a million degrees Kelvin is being ejected from the solar surface where the dark structures are only about 10,000 degrees.
Sunlight, the combination of all wavelengths of the visible spectrum, produces white light and has a color temperature of 4,000 to 5,000 degrees Kelvin.
At the heart of the system is a one-centimeter chip--less than half the size of a penny--made of niobium, which becomes a superconductor with zero resistance at 4 degrees Kelvin (-452 F)--nearly absolute zero, the coldest theoretical temperature attainable possible, at which no heat energy or kinetic energy remains in a substance.
Conventional superconductors were first discovered in the early 20th century, when Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes cooled mercury to four degrees Kelvin (-269 degrees Celsius), and observed that the material's electrical resistance dropped to zero.
However, UCLA noted that the hydrogen fuel must be stored at temperatures of approximately 77 degrees Kelvin.
Temperatures at the its core can reach 7500 degrees Kelvin - and that is hotter than the surface of the sun#SATURN THE planet - 'rock' No.
Back in the lab, they created a ceramic compound that superconducted at the highest temperature then known: 30 degrees Kelvin.
In addition, proper color temperature is important: Fluorescent lighting at 3,500 degrees Kelvin is ideal.
Two critical temperatures are measured: 1) the cryoshield is cooled to approximately 100 degrees Kelvin, and 2) the inner cryopanel is cooled to approximately 18 degrees Kelvin.
An alternative approach is to assume that the temperature dependence can be represented by an Arrhenius equation from which an activation energy can be calculated, t = A exp (E/RT) where A is a constant, E is the activation energy, R is the gas constant, and T is the cure temperature in degrees kelvin.
This is the first time that MCP devices have been targeted to operate at these high data rates at temperatures on the order of 10 degrees Kelvin," said Neal Sullivan, CTO Arradiance.
The researchers calculated that the white dwarf would be no more than a comparatively cool 3,000 degrees Kelvin (2,700 degrees Celsius).
Heating rate of materials can be hundreds of degrees Kelvin per minute.