recharge

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repower

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load anew

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charge anew

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References in periodicals archive ?
The SAGBI is based on five major factors that are critical to successful agricultural groundwater banking: deep percolation, root zone residence time, topography, chemical limitations and soil surface condition (see sidebar below).
The deep percolation factor is derived from the saturated hydraulic conductivity (K[sub.
Almost all the drip systems are designed for high efficiency; hence one can expect neither deep percolation nor runoff.
Also, the operational hours should be fixed in such a manner that both excessive flooding and deep percolation are avoided.
In the rice growing season, the data collected was rainfall, irrigation, runoff, evapotranspiration, subsurface drainage, evaporation and deep percolation.
Then, the values of evapotranspiration and deep percolation at the specified time period were calculated as follows:
Generally, the salinity of rainwater is less than that of applied water, and in California deep percolation and leaching of root zone salinity occur during the winter rainy season, when ET rates are generally low.
With knowledge of the crop type, planting and harvest dates, soil type, typical applied water depths and local reference ET and rainfall, a daily root zone water balance can be developed to compute daily irrigation requirements as well as deep percolation (root zone drainage) depths.
a] is the application efficiency, DPR is the deep percolation ratio, TWR is runoff ratio, DR is the deficit ratio.
In addition, there are no still deep percolation losses, but TWR greatly increases and [E.
Deep percolation is measured using wick lysimeters at 5 feet (1.
irrigation) have a great impact on the relationships between the amount of fertilizer applied, the crop yield, and the deep percolation of nitrate.
Improving these aspects of efficiency would not really help reduce deep percolation losses.
Our objectives were to determine daily and annual soil water use and deep percolation (recharge) rates from a vineyard and oak savanna or woodland under average climate conditions of the past decade in Sonoma County, and to determine the amount of tree canopy coverage that would result in net groundwater use or net recharge equivalent to that of a vineyard.
c]), infiltration by rain or irrigation and deep percolation losses to groundwater.
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