de jure

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Synonyms for de jure

legally

Synonyms

Antonyms

Synonyms for de jure

by right

Antonyms

by law

References in periodicals archive ?
By the Translation of Empire the Habsburg Emperors were by tradition still the rulers of the world de iure, although this designation had become a mere formality for Charles V (Wilson 2011; Birdal 2011, Ch 5; Scales 2012, Ch.
The first of the lectures was delivered at Christmas, 1528 (De potestate civili); De homicidio (June 11, 1530); De matrimonio (January 21, 1531); De potestate Ecclesiae prior (end of academic year, 1532); De potestate Ecclesiae posterior (May--June 1533); De potestate Papae et Concili (April--June 1534); De augmento charitatis (April 11, 1535); De eo ad quod tenetur (June 1535); De simonia (May--June 1536); De temperantia (1537); De Indis (January 1, 1539); De iure belli (June 18, 1539); and De magia (July 10, 1540).
The 16 papers explore what the De iure praedae reveals about the humanist theologian's early thought on the various forms of property transfer that, though forbidden during peacetime, were permitted and even sometimes encouraged during war, or other occasions of national rivalry.
59) Alberti's De iure steered clear of Justinianic texts that formed the core of legal teaching and practice, developing instead broad ethical concepts such as fides, religio, pietas, decor, and honestas.
2, De Iure Naturali, Gentium, et Civili) something is conceived and implemented (The Institutes, 1.
The authors' position is reminiscent of that of Carneades in Hugo Grotius's De iure belli ac pacis (1625), wherein the fictional character argues that there is no such thing as a universal obligatory natural law "because all creatures, men as well as animals, are impelled by nature towards ends advantageous to themselves.
37) Instead, Bell continued, "the Church may change the manner of election, and consequently, that no one certain kind of election, is de iure divino, decreed by God's law to be perpetual.
An ambitious Appendix of supporting documentation includes the rediscovered text of a preparatory sketch for the work, the short Tractatus de iure magistratuum (1614).
Et si iure testamenti non valeret, valeat et valere voluit dictus testator iure codicillorum et si iure eodicillorum non valeret, valele voluit dictus testator iure donationis causa mortis vel cuiuscunque alterius ultime voluntatis, quo, qua et quibus magis et melius et validius de iure substinere et valere potest.
Thus, as public opinion is consistently explored and the elected officials are inclined scrupulously to follow it, American democracy increasingly becomes direct democracy--if not de iure, then de facto.
Interestingly, it was not until this ukaz that the pool from which hierarchs were recruited, "learned monks"--that is, it will be recalled, the phenomenon of Church educators who took monastic vows but never lived in a monastery--were de iure relieved of their duty to serve in a monastery and thereby off icially accommodated in canon law.
court: no more, one might note, than she deserved, since if Henry had any de iure,
We will now examine its articles which are relevant to our topic and try to apply the legal framework to the de facto situation on North Kosovo and the de iure situation after the Brussels agreement.