honour

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Synonyms for honour

Synonyms for honour

References in periodicals archive ?
By dismissing a range of conventional explanations for the Southern "tendency," Culture of Honor implicitly questions the efficacy of certain policies.
Larsen, Aggression: Myths and Models (Chicago, 1976) 278; Nisbett and Cohen, Culture of Honor, 4; Marvin Wolfgang, Patterns of Criminal Homicide (Philadephia, 1958).
The clearest discussion of the culture of honor is in Julian Pitt-Rivers, The Fate of Shechem or the Politics of Sex: Essays in the Anthropology of the Mediterranean (Cambridge, 1977).
Thus, even in the principal area in which James believed that he had identified a culture of honor, the case cannot be sustained.
Mervyn James stressed the importance of a lord's reputation as an essential part of the culture of honor.
One could make a good case for Northumberland as a disordered county where a culture of honor might have been expected to thrive, but it would be difficult to sustain that case for the more tranquil Westmorland or Yorkshire.
While something to be celebrated and cherished, our strong identification with the culture of honors must also be maintained with caution; just as our Western cultural belief system may cast shadows on our view of other cultures, so our beliefs about education are filtered through the cultural lens of honors.
We would be wise to use his essay to help shape our future discourse on assessment, academic integrity, and the culture of honors.
Not just students or individual honors programs but the broader culture of honors will often emerge as a subject of conversation at NCHC conferences, and perspectives on this culture have shifted significantly during the past half-century.
Slavin's essay, along with the other five essays that were selected for publication, comprise a rich and varied conversation about the culture of honors.
George Mariz of Western Washington University, in "The Culture of Honors," ultimately echoes Charlie Slavin's definition of honors culture as intellectual risk-taking, but first he provides a historical and anthropological introduction to our general understanding of culture.
I am confident that the task of definition plays an important role in how we think about and discuss the culture of honors, and so this essay begins with some preliminary considerations of the concept of culture.
For two reasons none of the cultures mentioned above helps very much in defining the culture of honors: first, they are not connected in a systematic way to the academy, though adherents of many of them may be members of the academy; and second, none of them has a similarly serious purpose, at least in the eyes of those interested in a culture of honors.
Hoping to raise their students' awareness of their privileged status within honors, the authors have used ethnographic research projects and journals to elicit their students' understanding of the role of social class in the admissions process and in the general culture of honors.
While the social and behavioral sciences could obviously be addressed in this fashion, the editors had in mind in this instance a more direct application of these fields to honors students, faculty, and the culture of honors itself.