Oliver Cromwell

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Synonyms for Oliver Cromwell

English general and statesman who led the parliamentary army in the English Civil War (1599-1658)

References in periodicals archive ?
Cromwell's annual revenue now is about $20 million, "up and down depending on the economy," Penix says.
I am sure that JA does not want a repeat of Cromwell's idea of a republic, but, as the latest opinion polls show only 17% in favour of a republic, JA and other would-be republicans may have to wait a very long time to realise their dream.
Cromwell's attorneys argued during his trial that their client did not intentionally kill Wright, but instead suffered an extreme emotional disturbance that caused him to lose control of himself during the early morning hours of Nov.
Cromwell's most notorious act was the massacre of the 2,000-strong Royalist garrison at Drogheda in 1649.
With our newest venture, GovBuy, we hope to mirror that success in another new market while continuing to expand Brighton Cromwell's reach and market share,” said PresidentCEO Rob Van Etten.
Cromwell's fortunes were closely tied with the muchmarried king's second wife, Ann Boleyn, Queen of England from 1533 to 1536 who was subsequently beheaded.
Mantel] has no truck with the feminised Tudor history denounced by David Starkey, but sticks firmly to her agenda--male point-of-view, Cromwell's point-of-view, a political point-of-view, with no lust in the Tudor shrubbery.
A LEATHER jug made from the skin of Oliver Cromwell's war horse has emerged after 350 years.
He moved to Putney and married Thomas Cromwell's sister Katherine.
Cromwell's advance to the peak of power in Tudor society could have been the inspiration for the O'Henry model of rags-to-riches morality.
How Cromwell managed to do the unthinkable is captured in Hillary Mantel's 2009 Man Booker Prize-winning book Wolf Hall, a blow-by-blow account of Cromwell's ascent in the king's court (where 'man is wolf to man').
Such sentiments are linked to Cromwell's Irish adventures.
OLIVER Cromwell's historic hitching post is at the centre of a Llandaff pub dispute.
Cromwell's troops massacred soldiers, targeted civilians (including women and priests), and carried on 'ethnic cleansing' by deporting Irishmen to the West Indies.
Within three years, Charles II was back on the throne, and ordered Cromwell's corpse to be dug up and punished for sentencing his father Charles I to death.