crocodile

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  • noun

Words related to crocodile

large voracious aquatic reptile having a long snout with massive jaws and sharp teeth and a body covered with bony plates

References in classic literature ?
He knew more of the language of crocodiles than did any man.
Not of crocodiles," Hook corrected him, "but of that one crocodile.
When they have passed, comes the last figure of all, a gigantic crocodile.
When Tarzan of the Apes realized that he was in the grip of the great jaws of a crocodile he did not, as an ordinary man might have done, give up all hope and resign himself to his fate.
His efforts but served to accelerate the speed of the crocodile, and just as the ape-man realized that he had reached the limit of his endurance he felt his body dragged to a muddy bed and his nostrils rise above the water's surface.
he gave one last thought to his master; and began to struggle with all the energy of despair, feeling himself the while drawn along, but not toward the bottom of the lake, as is the habit of the crocodile when about to devour its prey, but toward the surface.
Instead a lusty cry for greater speed ahead urged the sinuous muscles gliding beneath the sleek brown hides; and when Muda Saffir rose to the surface with a cry for help upon his lips Ninaka shouted back to him in derision, consigning his carcass to the belly of the nearest crocodile.
Some crocodile has feasted well," he said significantly.
We had exhausted the crocodiles, and begun with the alligators, when the garden-bell rang.
So the Doctor went to the crocodile and told him he must go back to his circus.
I don't believe no Crocodile never walked along its own forehead
The crocodile, leaving scarcely a ripple behind, sank down and disappeared.
He found a serpent in the upper branches of the tree, and again being greatly alarmed, he threw himself into the river, where a crocodile caught him and ate him.
Once an unwary crocodile attacked him but the sinuous trunk dove beneath the surface and grasping the amphibian about the middle dragged it to light and hurled it a hundred feet down stream.
The magistrate who had reminded Gringoire of a crocodile rose,--