crime

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Related to Crimes: grimes
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Synonyms for crime

Synonyms for crime

a serious breaking of the public law

something that offends one's sense of propriety, fairness, or justice

a great disappointment or regrettable fact

Synonyms for crime

References in classic literature ?
Chance and genius give him the victory at Austerlitz; and by chance all men, not only the French but all Europe- except England which does not take part in the events about to happen- despite their former horror and detestation of his crimes, now recognize his authority, the title he has given himself, and his ideal of grandeur and glory, which seems excellent and reasonable to them all.
I have always heard that truly wise men are truly good men, and have a horror of crime.
At the Bar cafe, where the reporters assembled before going to any of the courts, or to the Prefecture, in search of their news of crime, he began to win a reputation as an unraveller of intricate and obscure affairs which found its way to the office of the Chief of the Surete.
You would convict men of crime, I would convict them of innocence.
Repair your crimes toward her; let her go free, and I will exact nothing else from you.
What say you to that crime, of which I have the proof?
said one of the councillors; "the crime is manifest, and it is late.
You know their doctrine; crime is a protest against the abnormality of the social organisation and nothing more, and nothing more; no other causes admitted
Next, as to the manner in which the crime was committed.
asked the Scarecrow, with a sigh, for such a crime had cast a gloom over all the company.
Oh," said Madame de Villefort, smiling, "are you courageous enough to sit down upon the very seat perhaps upon which the crime was committed?
No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offense to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use without just compensation.
It is the other part of your offence, therefore, upon which I intend to admonish you, I mean the violation of your chastity;--a crime, however lightly it may be treated by debauched persons, very heinous in itself, and very dreadful in its consequences.
In order to prevent this dreadful calamity they both set about inventing some plan which would throw suspicion on some one else, and at last they made up their minds that they could do no better than select a Jewish doctor who lived close by as the author of the crime.
Confound her, I couldn't make her see that sudden passion is an ex- tenuating circumstance in the killing of venison -- or of a person -- so I gave it up and let her sulk it out I DID think I was going to make her see it by remark- ing that her own sudden passion in the case of the page modified that crime.