crepitation

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  • noun

Synonyms for crepitation

the sharp sound of snapping noises

References in periodicals archive ?
These include basal crepitations, oedema, raised jugular venous pressure and hepatomegaly.
Breath sounds that are usually heard in BOOP patients are crackles and a clinical examination of the thorax demonstrates fine, dry lung crepitations.
He also developed tachycardia, tachypnea, and wet crepitations, as well as elevations in liver enzyme and eosinophilia levels.
Auscultatory examination of the chest revealed bilateral coarse crepitations, but no cardiac murmurs.
Cardiovascular congestion was defined clinically by the presence of symptoms and signs of heart failure including dyspnea, increased jugular venous pressure, and basal crepitations together with radiographic evidence of pulmonary venous congestion or interstitial edema (23) and resolution of symptoms, signs, and radiographic changes with hypertonic peritoneal dialysis exchanges.
Some of these patients had clinical symptoms including painful crepitations or "catching.
Important clinical parameters including pulse rate, blood pressure, oedema, jugular venous pressure (JVP), presence of murmurs and crepitations were recorded.
Other manifestations included tachycardia (3), tachypnoea (8), severe breathlessness (3), crepitations (4), haemorrhages (4) and urinary incontinence (2).
06), ventricular arrhythmia (electrocardiogram changes/medical treatment or cardioversion), heart rate <50 bpm requiring medical treatment/pacing), [section] pulmonary embolism (causing sudden death or computed tomography/scintigraphic changes), pneumonia (elevated temperature with radiographic changes), pulmonary congestion (shortness of breath, crepitations and medical treatment), pneumothorax (requiring drainage), [paragraph] anastomotic leakage, necrosis of stoma, superficial wound infection (surgical evacuation of pus or haematoma/secondary suture).
She was in severe respiratory distress and chest auscultation revealed global crepitations with increased intensity at the bases of the lungs.
Physical examination reveals signs of respiratory distress such as air hunger, use of accessory muscles of respiration, suprasternal and intercostal indrawing, central and peripheral cyanosis (reflecting the severity of arterial hypoxaemia), basal crepitations and expiratory wheezing (23-26).
Three influenza-infected children had clinical pneumonia (tachypnea defined by the World Health Organization) with crepitations.
His neck was supple with palpable crepitations on both sides of his neck, but more on the right.