Creole

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  • noun

Words related to Creole

a person of European descent born in the West Indies or Latin America

Related Words

a person descended from French ancestors in southern United States (especially Louisiana)

Related Words

a mother tongue that originates from contact between two languages

References in periodicals archive ?
Lately, I've heard that they would like to found a Creole Academy.
An International Creole Institute was officially opened on Friday 10th December in the mid-ocean islands of the Seychelles.
Most creoles were in fact native sons, but not all; the Spanish Crown sometimes appointed creoles to office in places other than their region of origin, and some creoles moved to other regions of the Americas in search of opportunity.
Picturing black New Orleans; a Creole photographer's view of the early twentieth century.
Historical romance offers fascinating introduction to 1846 New Orleans, its passionate Creole people, and a beguiling Creole belle named Desiree Bordeaux.
We'll be heading south down the Mississippi to the place where European traditions blend with Caribbean influences, the street names are found in Spanish and French and the Creole architecture is vibrant with tropical colors.
In all the countries where Spanish is the official language (S), Creoles are marginal, both in the islands (Cuba, Dominican Republic) and the continent.
In the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom, Caribbean English-based Creoles are the most common nonstandard dialects of English (1) in schools due to the increasing rate of migration from the Anglophone Caribbean.
In New Spain he favored giving more opportunities to Creoles, thereby cementing bonds of trust and reciprocal interest.
Bound by an editorial convention that should probably change in its wake, Creole Gentlemen capitalizes the term "Creole" as if it were an unshakable ethnic affiliation.
The defeat of the formerly "triumphant" Inca kings, in other words, only underscores the glory of the "Spanish Inca," Philip V, to whom creoles like Peralta--if not the natives, who may of course have interpreted their participation differently (see Dean)--seek to render their devotion in the festival.
Though the Laveaus' ghosts were slippery, Ward was able to conjure up a shimmery image of them and that image was of two strong business-savvy, spiritually powerful Creole women who lived life to the fullest.
To discover how the Creoles celebrated the holidays, tour the French Quarter's historic homes.
The Creoles - there are six of them - and the etouffees - seven in number - form the signature dishes of Mardi Gras, and they deliver what's expected, although one night shrimp creole ($12.
It is a well-documented fact that situations where creoles develop involve several substratum languages and one (or at least one major) superstratum language.