creed

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Related to Creeds: Apostles Creed
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Synonyms for creed

Synonyms for creed

a system of religious belief

Synonyms for creed

References in periodicals archive ?
The 30-year-old from Maesgeirchen, Bangor, had admitted being drunk and throwing a vodka bottle which smashed a bedroom window at the home of Noah and Charlene Creed on the same estate, claiming he'd gone to the house to buy drugs.
From there begins the history of the Creed of the Noncommissioned Officer.
Ancient peoples ascribed more power to the spoken than to the written word, and ancient creeds are based on oral baptismal confessions spoken in the presence of the Christian community.
Yoder returned again to the question of the authority of the classic creeds at the conclusion of his Preface lectures on Chalcedon.
Credo: Historical and Theological Guide to Creeds and Confessions of Faith in the Christian Tradition.
This is the introductory volume to the four-volume Creeds and Confessions of Faith in the Christian Tradition edited by Jaroslav Pelikan and Valerie Hotchkiss.
I have recently come across several people who find the creeds unsatisfactory.
The authority residing in institutions and creeds meant nothing to baby boomers, but finding the last "good man" and abandoning nearly all caution and doubt by investing total authority in his or her directions, was the most general pattern I observed.
The Pennsylvania rock quartet, which out-Creeds Creed on the current hit single ``Hemorrhage (In My Hands),'' played more than 450 shows in support of its 1998 debut.
The Creeds have had a home computer for the past seven years.
The classic creeds of Christianity--above all the Apostles Creed and the Nicene Creed--give magnificent expression to the conviction that what we believe about the world makes a difference and that being Christian is more than simply being sincere or having genuine emotions.
Birch goes so far as to say that "subscription to creeds is a danger to the integrity of conscience" (14).
Creeds--from the Latin word credo, or "I believe"--have long been part of the Christian tradition: the Apostles' Creed spells out the faith of the apostles; the Athanasian Creed focuses on the fifth-century understanding of Jesus; the 1968 "Credo of the People of God" reaffirms Catholic truths in the face of modernity.