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Synonyms for copyright

a document granting exclusive right to publish and sell literary or musical or artistic work

secure a copyright on a written work

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References in periodicals archive ?
On behalf of the global Creative Commons community I want to thank Teespring and Noun Project for launching this collaboration to celebrate our beloved CC logo," said Creative Commons CEO Ryan Merkley.
Licensing Ohloh data under Creative Commons offers both enterprises and the open source community a new level of access to FOSS data, allowing trending, tracking, and insight for the open source community," said Tim Yeaton, President and CEO of Black Duck Software.
By applying Creative Commons to your work you are sending a clear message that you want to work with others around the world and that you are open to new ideas, advances, adaptations and insights.
Kay Kremerskothen, 200Million Creative Commons Photos and
A Creative Commons license does not mean that copyright does not apply to a work.
The event showcased regional DJs and VJs, featured live visual mixing and remixing of art, movies and comics, and highlighted a variety of creative projects in Qatar that utilise Creative Commons licences, including photography, essays, blogs, a student-film, fashion and even a web TV series.
Flickr functions under Creative Commons (CC), a non-profit organization that provides free copyright licences to the public.
It will be replaced by a Creative Commons type licence, devised by the Office of Public Sector Information (OPSI), which is already used on data.
Second, consider using a Creative Commons license (www.
Material released for public information by Australian governments should be released under a creative commons licence.
While it is not a condition of participation in the Re-Picture Australia initiative, we strongly suggest image makers license their artworks using a Creative Commons licence.
At the forefront of this second movement is Creative Commons, a web-based intellectual property sharing schema developed by a consortium headed by Professor Lawrence Lessig of Stanford Law School.
Copyright for articles is retained by authors, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which allows articles to be freely downloaded from the BioMed Central website and re-used and re-distributed without restriction, as long as the original work is correctly cited.
It should be a requisite that anything developed should be produced as either open source, creative commons or published with the rights that any Wales-based organisation can use and modify it.
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