Crane


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Synonyms for Crane

United States writer (1871-1900)

United States poet (1899-1932)

a small constellation in the southern hemisphere near Phoenix

Synonyms

lifts and moves heavy objects

large long-necked wading bird of marshes and plains in many parts of the world

stretch (the neck) so as to see better

Synonyms

Related Words

References in classic literature ?
Certain it is, this was not the case with the redoubtable Brom Bones; and from the moment Ichabod Crane made his advances, the interests of the former evidently declined: his horse was no longer seen tied to the palings on Sunday nights, and a deadly feud gradually arose between him and the preceptor of Sleepy Hollow.
Happily, Ichabod Crane was not in so great a hurry as his historian, but did ample justice to every dainty.
It is true, an old farmer, who had been down to New York on a visit several years after, and from whom this account of the ghostly adventure was received, brought home the intelligence that Ichabod Crane was still alive; that he had left the neighborhood partly through fear of the goblin and Hans Van Ripper, and partly in mortification at having been suddenly dismissed by the heiress; that he had changed his quarters to a distant part of the country; had kept school and studied law at the same time; had been admitted to the bar; turned politician; electioneered; written for the newspapers; and finally had been made a justice of the ten pound court.
Crane is a genius who's made his own way, you try to suggest he's a murderer without daring to say so.
Leonard Crane turned his pale face round the circle of faces till he came to Juliet's; then he compressed his lips a little and said:
He appeared exceedingly well," replied Crane, with a curious intonation.
asked the investigator; and Leonard Crane made no reply.
Crane, and when we told my brother he did not approve of it; that is all.
Crane mislaid his sword, not to mention his companion.
And may I ask," inquired Crane, with a certain flicker of mockery passing over his pallid features, "what I am supposed to have done with either of them?
And, by the way, I wish you'd speak to Crane some time.
When the two armies joined battle, the cranes would rush forward, flapping their wings and stretching out their necks, and would perhaps snatch up some of the Pygmies crosswise in their beaks.
In the remaining part of the story, I shall tell you of a far more astonishing battle than any that was fought between the Pygmies and the cranes.
I put it to you in full confidence of a response that shall be worthy of our national character, and calculated to increase, rather than diminish, the glory which our ancestors have transmitted to us, and which we ourselves have proudly vindicated in our warfare with the cranes.
He left them, one and all, within their own territory, where, for aught I can tell, their descendants are alive to the present day, building their little houses, cultivating their little fields, spanking their little children, waging their little warfare with the cranes, doing their little business, whatever it may be, and reading their little histories of ancient times.