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For more information about the Cranberry Institute, along with the health benefits of cranberries and current scientific research, visit www.
You've probably heard about the benefits of cranberries from friends or family.
Considering the antimicrobial effects and health benefits of cranberries, cranberry-marinated chicken wings might be a safe and healthy product for consumers.
Those are the phytochemicals lip in cranberries that seem to keep bacteria from sticking to the surfaces of bladder ceils.
Cranberries have proven their mettle in fighting urinary tract infections (UTIs).
British cheesemaker The Wensleydale Creamery has added 30 percent more Ocean Spray sweetened dried cranberries (SDCs) to its best-selling Real Yorkshire Wensleydale with Cranberries cheese.
Cranberries have a relatively high oxalate concentration, so concerns have been raised that consumption of cranberry products might increase the risk of developing calcium oxalate kidney stones.
Boiled cranberries and seal oil to reduce the severity of gall bladder attacks was adopted by folk medicine practitioners of New England (NIH 2005, ADAM Inc 2004, Siciliano 1996).
While still on the vine, cranberries have fantastic natural defences against bacterial or fungal attack.
Only one of the three commercially grown fruits unique to North America, the others being blueberries and Concord grapes, cranberries are today gaining in popularity as a healthy and tasty versatile culinary fruit.
The research is the latest in a line of studies that confirm the benefit of certain compounds found in cranberries to oral health.
Cranberries may be a Thanksgiving Day tradition, but do not overlook these ruby gems of good health throughout the rest of the year, as they are a good source of vitamin C while containing phytochemicals--plant-derived nutrients that have potential health benefits.
Orange Cranberry Mustard has the sweetness of oranges and the tanginess of cranberries.
Twelve years ago, scientists uncovered a mechanism to explain why the folk remedy of eating cranberries fights urinary tract infections.