courtesan

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  • noun

Synonyms for courtesan

Synonyms for courtesan

Synonyms for courtesan

a woman who cohabits with an important man

References in periodicals archive ?
Here the carriage parade of courtesans and patrons through the commercial avenues to Zhang Yuan, the first public garden in the Shanghai concessions opened to Chinese people, offers a salient example of the public visibility.
Other exhibition highlights include 18th-century paintings and prints of courtesans by some of Japan's most important artists: Katsukawa ShunshEi (d.
In a discussion of Bellamira, in Marlowe's Jew of Malta, Ithamore's offhand reference to knowing a courtesan by her attire give rise to a wealth of archival documentation attesting to the affinity between courtesans and taffeta, including the colorful case of a "Taffety Meg" prosecuted for lewd behavior (111).
For Chandra it is an exercise in retracing through various religious and ancient literary texts the glory of the courtesans of yesteryears, which has fallen into a decline post-medieval India and is now driven by money rather than 'the arts', and for Sampath it is a heritage of women singers (specifically Gauhar Jan) that has been uniquely preserved without distortion because of the marvels of technology.
Courtesans also figure in English texts of this period as evidence of Italian depravity and inferiority.
The difference between a high-priced prostitute and a courtesan is that prostitutes sell "by the hour" sex, whereas courtesans provide companionship of which sex is only a part.
The fact that the courtesans are pictured in full-sized portraits, with their faces totally revealed, makes them the first women to become publicly "visible" in Lucknow.
Despite their beauty, sexual prowess, and much sought after personalities, courtesans lived lives that were socially constrained and isolated.
Courtesans have fascinated even the most polite society for centuries and it seems that even in these more permissive times their thrall is as strong as ever.
The author describes the courtesans along with the tabloid industry as "a new kind of commercially driven entertainment culture, which had profound implications for the larger transformations of the city.
Merchants, scholars, housewives, magistrates, craftsmen, courtesans, abbots, nuns, and children populate these creative, witty, and insightful tales, which cover a surprisingly broad cross-section of Chinese life of the era, both urban and rural.
Martha Feldman and Bonnie Gordon have conceived, nurtured, and delivered a very successful multidisciplinary collection on courtesans and their artistic and cultural performance.
Two years ago it appeared for a handful of performances at Lincoln Center's great Ashton Festival, and this year it gave Kenneth MacMillan's Manon in Boston (to which wild courtesans could not have dragged me) and a mixed bill along with its new staging of The Sleeping Beauty, a ballet that has proved one of its truly iconic treasures, in Washington.
It was set in bohe-mian Paris at the turn of the 20th century, so staff and students at the Edgbaston-based university were treated to the sight of courtesans dressed in can-can costume.
In this scholarly but very readable and interesting book, we learn about Barbara Strozzi (1619-1677) the singer, composer, businesswoman and associate of the Venetian elite, whose talents were so similar to those of courtesans, that her true profession is debatable.