lady-in-waiting

(redirected from Court lady)
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  • noun

Words related to lady-in-waiting

a lady appointed to attend to a queen or princess

References in periodicals archive ?
Court Lady is emphatically bodiless insofar as it is emphatically hollow.
Court Lady and Country Wife is an account of the lives of Dorothy and Lucy Percy, daughters of the ninth Earl of Northumberland.
In Stefano Guazzo's The Civile Conversation, for instance, the perfect courtier Anniball Magnocavalli describes the speech of the exemplary court lady as follows: "her talke and discourses are so delightfull, that you wyll only then beginne to bee sory, when shee endeth to speake: and wishe that shee woulde bee no more weary to speake, then you are to heare.
The author was a court lady whose life remains a mystery.
In addition, a mileage pool and bingo offer other chances to court lady luck.
Robert LaFosse as Herr Drosselmeier almost took flight as he flourished his cape, and William Otto's Mother Ginger preened and sashayed with the charm of a court lady.
The third book features Giuliano de ' Medici 's discourse on the donna di palazzo, the court lady, who is required to maintain her femininity while displaying a knowledge of letters, the arts, and how to entertain the court.
Eight years later Anne was replaced by Jane Seymour, another court lady, and although Henry's marriage to her successor, Anne of Cleves, was a reversion to a diplomatic wife, wives five and six, Katherine Howard and Katherine Parr, were also the King's personal selection from within the court.
Written by a court lady nearly 1,000 years ago, the Tale of Genji is generally regarded as the world's first great novel.
At the opposite, iconic end of the scale sat the court lady, a prominent but mostly decorative presence in Castiglione's Il Cortigiano, serving as medium and mirror of male perfection.
It faithfully depicts aristocratic life in 10th-11th-century Japan, as does a work by another court lady, which Waley translated as The Pillow-Book of Sei Sho^Onagon (1928).
During the ceremonial preparations on the eve of her wedding, Hippolyta receives no more than the attentions prescribed by decorum from Theseus, who shows more interest in a young court lady.
Appeal Court Lady Justice Mary Arden found that even though ex-jail bird Miller employed ex-offenders he "still has to comply with the law" and that his attempts to straighten out his business were "not adequate".
Outside the court Lady Alice said: "Sam needs help.
The visitors were included in several courtly pastimes, among them a hunt and a ball, where one of them caused some mirth by asking an elderly court lady to join in a dance.