copyright

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Synonyms for copyright

a document granting exclusive right to publish and sell literary or musical or artistic work

secure a copyright on a written work

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References in periodicals archive ?
Copyrightability provides fertile terrain for exploring
34) The Feist standard presents a relatively low hurdle for copyrightability.
In a nutshell, the copyrightability of standards lies in their private nature.
Even when courts accept the copyrightability of sexually explicit works, they have sometimes disfavored works with sexual content when determining the scope of copyright protection and also when evaluating claims of fair use by defendants.
Copyrightability of real estate information, following Salestraq Am.
54) This request can be interpreted as a benevolent approach to copyrightability of the event itself.
Although nothing more than this is required to satisfy this first requisite for copyrightability, some further analytical examination is necessary as some parts of the legal document may have been copied from another work.
13) If authorial effort is a measure of copyrightability, the fact that some kinds of factual compilations once received copyright protection does not necessarily mean that they deserve the same protection to day.
Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit (which includes California) cast doubt on the copyrightability of fictional characters divorced from stories.
Nice try, but the "useful arts" term mentioned in the Copyright Clause is referring to inventions, not writings, and nobody has ever argued that "bodily needs" have anything whatsoever to do with copyrightability.
The requirements for copyrightability are that a work must be original (i.
The menu structure, taken as a whole--including the choice of command terms, the structure and order of these terms, their presentation on the screen, and the long prompts--is an aspect of 1-2-3 that is not present in every expression of an electronic spreadsheet [and therefore) meets the requirements of the legal test of copyrightability," Judge Keeton said.