cone cell

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Related to Cone cells: Rods and cones
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Synonyms for cone cell

a visual receptor cell in the retina that is sensitive to bright light and to color

References in periodicals archive ?
Initial symptoms are loss of peripheral and night vision, followed by diminished visual acuity and color perception as cone cells also begin to fail and die.
Because the eye is constantly jiggling, the researchers had to determine the pattern of the eye movements to predict where cone cells would be several milliseconds in the future.
Fossilized rod and cone cells the kinds that help people see in color and detail have been discovered for the first time in a 300millionyearold fossil specimen of a fish called Acanthodes bridgei, according to a scientific study recently published in Nature Communications journal.
Dogs have "low-resolution vision" when compared to people because they have a proportionately a lower number of what are called cone cells in their retinas--the light-sensitive layer at the back of the eye.
The retina has three layers of nerve cells, but only the outer layer contains the rod and cone cells that respond to light, enabling us to see the world.
Cats have "low-resolution" vision when compared to people because they have a proportionately lower number of what are called cone cells in their retinas--the light-sensitive layer at the back of the eye.
The result is defects of the light-sensitive pigment in the retina's cone cells that distinguish colour.
The different wavelengths of light activate the cone cells at the back of the eye which pass the message to the brain.
Like several other types of retinal neurons, cone cells develop into what is known as a "mosaic" because there is a degree of regular spacing between the cone cells of specific type, for example, red cones.
AAQ binds to ion channels in retina cells and alters the flow of ions in response to light, mimicking how normal rods and cone cells react to light and activate neurons.
When you look straight at the planetary you will be using the central cone cells in your eye which, although sensitive to colour, are not particularly sensitive to faint light.
There are three types of cone cells, each sensitive to the long, medium or short wavelength of light (red, blue and green color respectively).
Their works demonstrated that cone cells that lacked RB1 genes had a cell signalling network which suppressed normal cell death pathways and promoted cell survival.
L and S cone cells acting together can produce a pinky-purple colour called magenta.