computed tomography

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  • noun

Synonyms for computed tomography

a method of examining body organs by scanning them with X rays and using a computer to construct a series of cross-sectional scans along a single axis

References in periodicals archive ?
The initial computed tomography scan in the first patient showed some peri-lesion contrast enhancement around the abscess, consistent with slow arterial blood flow.
The rational use of computed tomography scans in the diagnosis of appendicitis.
While computed tomography scan is helpful in delineating the cyst location and extent in relation to the base of the tongue, vallecula and thyroid gland (3), it also helps to plan the optimal route of passage of the endotracheal tube or fibreoptic bronchoscope.
After surgery, the patient remained comatose, and another computed tomography scan revealed evidence of cerebral edema, contusion of the left temporal lobe, and some residual epidural hematoma on the left side.
Computed tomography scan showed bilateral atypical reticulonodular infiltrations predominant in the lower zones of the lungs (Figure).
The investigation of choice is plain film cystography, which should include anteroposterior, oblique, or lateral and postdrain views; computed tomography scan cystography is more ideal in patients undergoing computed tomography scan for other injuries associated with blunt trauma.
Paranasal sinus computed tomography scan findings in patients with cystic fibrosis.
After 10 days of broad-spectrum antibiotics and with progressing infiltrates, a computed tomography scan of the chest revealed a right lung abscess, a tracheo-esophageal fistula, and a right pleural effusion.
After computed tomography scan, it was discovered that liver tumor has relapsed and worsened with the emergence of liver cirrhosis, splenomegaly and esophageal variceal bleeding.
A computed tomography scan showing multiple filling defects at the middle of left ureter, and probable left psoas invasion.
We obtained cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from patients with a negative or equivocal computed tomography scan by the standard lumbar puncture procedure.
A computed tomography scan of the abdomen and pelvis with oral and intravenous contrast post-right hip disarticulation.
The correct diagnosis was rapidly made using a low-dose delayed-enhanced cardiac multidetector computed tomography scan performed immediately after a normal coronary angiogram, demonstrating typical myocardial late hyperenhancement and good correlation with delayed enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.
The x-ray films of the chest and computed tomography scan of the thorax and abdomen were normal.
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