Drosophila melanogaster

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Related to Common fruit fly: Fruit flies
  • noun

Synonyms for Drosophila melanogaster

small fruit fly used by Thomas Hunt Morgan in studying basic mechanisms of inheritance

References in periodicals archive ?
The research team, comprising scientists from the University's School of Physiology and Pharmacology, conducted experiments using the common fruit fly (Drosophila) to analyze and identify the molecular mechanisms behind this switch.
The research team comprising of scientists from the University's School of Physiology and Pharmacology, conducted experiments using the common fruit fly [Drosophila] to analyse and identify the molecular mechanisms behind this switch.
The study, published today in The Journal of Experimental Biology, examined how pheromones play a role in the sexual attractiveness and aging process of the common fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, says Scott D.
In 1999, Carlson's group and another research team reported that studies of the common fruit fly had uncovered insect odor receptors for the first time (SN: 4/10/99, p.
The larvae of the common fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, eat the rot, or fungi and bacteria, that grows on overripe, fermenting fruit.
Singh calls the common fruit fly "the Cinderella of modern genetics" because it has similar genetic traits as humans.
That's comparable to the number in the common fruit fly (SN: 6/10/00, p.
The studies were performed using the common fruit fly - Drosophila melanogaster.
SEATTLE -- Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center scientists report a finding in the common fruit fly that may open new paths for understanding some of the key genetic missteps that lead to cancer in humans.
15 SCIENCE, the researchers ultimately found a mutated gene that nearly doubles the average life span of Drosophila melanogaster, the common fruit fly.
Washington, August 11 ( ANI ): A developmental geneticist has used a common fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) to probe the question as to why the propagation of every animal on the planet is the result of sexual activity between males and females of a given species.
Until now, scientists had relied on Drosophila melanogaster, the common fruit fly, as a model system from which to extrapolate information about what gene products or proteins could be relevant insecticide targets.