Falco tinnunculus

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Synonyms for Falco tinnunculus

small Old World falcon that hovers in the air against a wind

Synonyms

References in periodicals archive ?
The authority's Eastern Region Branch was able to provide various treatments to the injured bird, a common kestrel, EPAA said in a press release.
Al Naqbi noted that common kestrel is usually found in rocky or stone mountains.
The northern species of common kestrel are migrant birds that spend winter in areas extending from the Arabian Peninsula to Southeast Asia.
Given the very tight time constraints I decided on the Gezira Club where, for the price of LE 100 I could definitely find Common Bulbuls, Hoopoes, Graceful Warblers, Common Kestrels, Rose-ringed Parakeets and hopefully a load of migrants and who knows, perhaps Sardinian Warbler and Indian Silverbill.
06 birds /km2, common kestrel in five sites with mean density of 0.
Key words: Chakwal, falcons, Falco Cherrug, red-headed merlin, common kestrel, population.
Common kestrel (Falco tinnunculus) is resident and breeds in the mountain tracts of Pakistan; also a winter migrant to the plains.
71, respectively, and it was prefered for utilization of nests by common kestrel (Table II).
Common kestrel was identified in five study sightings of this species were recorded (Fig.
The first common kestrel was observed in September 2009 flying over a peanut field.
In northern goshawks (Accipiter gentilis), common buzzards, and common kestrels (Falco tinnunculus), significant differences in IOP between juvenile and adult birds were found (P [less than or equal to] .
96 mm Hg in Eurasian eagle owls (Bubo bubo), which are concordant with our results in common kestrels and the owl species.
8,9) In contrast, age differences have to be considered because we found significant differences between juvenile and adult northern goshawks, common buzzards, and common kestrels.
The aim of this research was to describe morphometric aspects of healthy right and left eyeballs from wild, adult, male and female common kestrels (Falco tinnunculus) and to measure the thickness of their cornea, retina, choroid, and sclera.
A total of 13 free-living common kestrels that were admitted to the Clinics for Birds.