Rana temporaria

(redirected from Common Frog)
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  • noun

Synonyms for Rana temporaria

a common semiterrestrial European frog

References in periodicals archive ?
The completed Daily Post frog forms (of which there were many) showed the following returns: common frog 284; common toad 86; common newt 59, and great crested newt 1.
Common frogs often breed in small ponds, and garden pools are ideal.
Common frogs often breed in smaller ponds,garden pools being ideal.
Nearly half of people in West Yorkshire who took part in the Big Garden Birdwatch see common frogs in their gardens on a regular basis and grey squirrels are also regular guests.
We know that common frog and greenfinch populations have declined as a result of disease and keeping an eye on our British garden species is crucial if we are to understand the threats to their health, which not only affects individual animals, but can impact entire populations.
Like the common frog, a toad's colour changes depending on environmental conditions ?
Pathological and microbiological findings from incidents of unusual mortality of the common frog (Rana temporaria).
While collecting at Omar Torrijos National Park, Lips' team noticed a common frog much bigger than specimens collected elsewhere.
McCormick Tribune Place and Ice Rink, Chicago; Boston Common Frog Pond, Boston; Olympic Speed Skating Oval, Lake Placid; Downtown on Ice, Los Angeles; The U.
The influence of land use on the genetic structure of populations of the common frog Rana temporaria.
Amber, who spent a month analysing the common frog in the Dublin area, said: "By studying the Irish frog population we can get an invaluable look at how English frogs would have been before they were ravaged by the disease.
Establishment of populations of the common frog, Rana temporaria, and common toad, Bufo bufo, in a newly created reserve following translocation.
A widespread European species called the common frog (Rana temporaria) engages in standard frog-mating behavior.
A survey carried out by Trent Polytechnic in Nottingham showed that populations of the once Common Frog have plummeted to below 30 per cent of their former levels.
In the pools and former farm ponds are many amphibians including great crestednewt, common toad and common frog breed.