commensal

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Related to Commensality: swayed, Sound symbolism, embarkation
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  • noun
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Words related to commensal

either of two different animal or plant species living in close association but not interdependent

Related Words

living in a state of commensalism

References in periodicals archive ?
Through the ceremonial distribution and commensality of the sacrificial meat, the members of the paternal/fraternal organisation produced and reproduced the social substance of the collectivity connecting one to another, and the living sons to deceased fathers, as well as articulating the individual initiation sets into the cohesive paternal/fraternal socio-cultural order.
It is important to note that in these rituals of commensality the living and the dead probably shared food; the operative factor is the transmission of corpse contamination through contact.
The hall, although it had long since ceased to be the exclusive focus of eating and sociability, still provided the central stage on which the drama of commensality could be enacted.
Contemporary and interdisciplinary biblical scholarship has helped widen our knowledge of what open commensality meant in that social context.
Thus, the eighty Portuguese noblemen accommodated in the juderia of Fez were looked after by their Jewish hosts, among them Abraham Rute, the brother of Jacob (II) Rute, in a spirit of tolerance, commiseration, and, most surprisingly, commensality.
symbols, inscriptions, calendar, commensality, gender, and health care.
These social bonds were maintained by different forms of commensality and rituals.
A potent source of male energy and power, food provides the fuel necessary for knightly action, while commensality strengthens the fraternal bonds that underpin Camelot's civic society.
those based upon co-residence, or commensality, or name-sharing--are at least as salient as procreative ones in human communities, and that for this reason there is no warrant for granting privileged status to procreatively-derived relationships.
Together, these policies use the commensality of hunger (a shared diet) and the hope it generates to foreground a vision of sharing of plenty.
The expansion of the concept of enskilment evidenced through Gisili Palsson's (1994) work with Icelandic fishermen and Heather Paxson's (2010) work on cheesemaking and terroir will help to better contextualize enskilment within the confines of food production and commensality.
i) fixed territory, (ii) lack of occupational specialization, (iii) lack of social ranking with reference to a large community, and (iv) absence of commensality rules.