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Synonyms for count

matter

Synonyms

include

Synonyms

  • include
  • number among
  • take into account or consideration

count on or upon something or someone

Synonyms for count

to note (items) one by one so as to get a total

to be of significance or importance

to indicate (time or rhythm), as with repeated gestures or sounds

Synonyms

count on: to place trust or confidence in

count on: to look forward to confidently

count out: to keep from being admitted, included, or considered

a noting of items one by one

Synonyms for count

a nobleman (in various countries) having rank equal to a British earl

have weight

Synonyms

Related Words

show consideration for

name or recite the numbers in ascending order

put into a group

include as if by counting

Related Words

have a certain value or carry a certain weight

Related Words

have faith or confidence in

take account of

References in periodicals archive ?
14) We are not normally so well placed to show it, but my guess is that if we were we should find that the same was true at the castellanic or comital level after 1000: that Bissonic `violence' was usually not `affective', but quite meaningful and controlled, both in the means used and the targets chosen.
Los espacios politicos aparecen definidos como territoria o pagi, integrados en las demarcaciones bajo mando comital.
In the first part of the book, he traces the development of the comital state to provide the necessary background for his close study of the region's elites.
The counts of the twelfth century replaced the hereditary feudal viscounts who acted as prosecutors of comital justice in the cities and rural districts or kasselrijen of the county with comital bailiffs they could appoint and remove.
Similar movements initiated by martial impulses are recorded in Maria Branco's coverage of Portugal where, in the twelfth century, Count Alfonso was elevated to the throne; in the process, his comital advisors became royal ones overnight.
In twelfth-century Languedoc, the alliance between Church and state that marked the growth of comital and royal power in northern France failed to develop because of the political fragmention of the region.
To take only the most telling point: there were thirteen shires south of the Mersey and Tees where the Mercian comital dynasty as represented by the brothers Edwin and Morcar had no significant interests.