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Knox read classics at King's College, Cambridge and began codebreaking long before Turing at Bletchley Park.
THE IMITATION GAME (Channel 4, Tonight, 9pm) THIS is a handsomely crafted tribute to codebreaking prodigy Alan Turing, whose invaluable contribution to the war effort was besmirched by bigotry.
One of these was Ultra, the British codebreaking effort against the German foe.
00, 10 June & 8 October 2016 Clandestine operations, Enigma Machines and tales of spies and deception are brought to life on this fascinating visit to Bletchley Park, site of secret codebreaking activities and of Churchill's 'Silent Geese' whose mathematical genius hastened the end of WW2.
Their secret codebreaking unit Room 40 had intercepted and deciphered wireless messages between the Zeppelins and their base, and the authorities in Edinburgh were put on alert.
Another group of students, in years 7 - 9, looked at cryptography throughout the ages and practised using a variety of codebreaking techniques.
00, 29 April, 13 August & 7 October 2016 Clandestine operations, Enigma Machines and tales of spies and deception are brought to life on this fascinating visit to Bletchley Park, site of secret codebreaking activities and of Churchill's 'Silent Geese' whose mathematical genius hastened the end of WW2.
GRWP LLANDRILLO MENAI A Grwp Llandrillo Menai Maths Day initiative gave students and local school pupils the opportunity to get close to one of the most important pieces of British wartime history: a genuine World War II Enigma codebreaking machine.
Q's use of a branded laptop for real-time decryption is a neat piece of product placement, but ignores the fact that most codebreaking would use specialized supercomputers and be conducted, monotonously, over a period of weeks (if indeed it is vulnerable to decryption at all).
The book was first published in 1983 when information about Ultra and the Enigma codebreaking was still becoming public knowledge, and sources on Turing and his work were not extensive.
Max Hastings's 25th book is a lively, entertaining, but uneven yomp through espionage and codebreaking in the 1940s, which aims to cut through the clouds of mythology and establish just what contribution the cloak-and-dagger boys made to the outcome of the war.
In January 1945, at the peak of codebreaking efforts, some 9,000 personnel were working at Bletchley.
Codebreaking refers to the fundamental motor skills and movement patterns along with visual body signifiers and gestural language codes;
During World War II, British government agents developed Enigma, a codebreaking machine that enabled them to intercept Nazi military plans.