coal

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Synonyms for coal

fossil fuel consisting of carbonized vegetable matter deposited in the Carboniferous period

a hot fragment of wood or coal that is left from a fire and is glowing or smoldering

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burn to charcoal

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supply with coal

take in coal

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References in periodicals archive ?
Major and trace element distributions in coal and coaly shale seams in the Enugu Escarpment of southeastern Nigeria.
Brokenhearted grandaughter Debbie, Ben, grandson Carl and son in law Coaly xxx ROBINSON - MAMIE (MAY), September 15, 2012, aged 94 years.
Cardiff was on the verge of greatness, a coaly Klondyke on its way to becoming the World's Greatest Coal Port.
Burnett, '"Hail brither Scots o' coaly Tyne": Networking and Identity among Scottish Migrants in the North East of England, c.
The downhole geophysical logs in vintage petroleum wells Booran-1, East Yeeda-1, Millard-1 and Puratte-1, within 5/07-8 EP, as well as nearby wells Kora-1, Runthrough-1 and Whitewall-1 all display a similar geophysical signature to Petaluma-1 indicating that the coaly unit of the Lightjack Formation is present over the entire permit.
The black hills of Wales reflect a bitter coaly heart, broken by the collapse of traditional industries and spurned by her English masters.
These strata comprise beds of medium- to dark-grey laminated shale bearing roots, with intermittent 1 cm thick layers of coaly shale.
Within the scope of solution first samples of clean power plant stabilizer and coaly claystone were taken for which the value of soil reaction in water leaching was determined.
These gave rise to a serious attempt at coal exploitation in the early part of the 20th century, an attempt which was doomed to failure in view of the lenticular nature of the coaly layers and the very small thicknesses involved (only a few centimetres where coal smuts have been seen in outcrop).
There's nivor a lad like my lad drives te the staithes on Tyne, He's coaly black on workdays, but on holidays he's fine.
The 1887 painting Under the Coaly <B Tyne, by J Hodgson Campbell, in the Mining Institute, Newcastle, portraying a miner at the coal face of what is believed to be Redheugh Colliery