clod

(redirected from Cloddy)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for clod

Synonyms for clod

an irregularly shaped mass of indefinite size

Synonyms for clod

an awkward stupid person

References in periodicals archive ?
Comparison of the percent reflectance of various wavelengths of light by the granular red imported fire ant nest soil and by the surrounding cloddy ordinary soil.
If the entire field starts to blow, it is sometimes recommended that the surface be made rough and cloddy as soon as practicable.
When the sun 'sees' a site, it warms the soil, keeps its moisture content tolerable, and ensures that it remains friable not becoming sticky, cloddy, heavy and wet, and difficult to cultivate.
Because the polymer only treats the thin surface soil layer, a cloddy surface or poor spray application decreases effectiveness.
Tillage used for weed control and seedbed preparation dries the surface soil and creates cloddy seedbeds that require rainfall for final seedbed preparation.
The most satisfying thing is to see the returning tilth and fertility of the soil, when I can grab a handful of dark, rich crumbly soil where before the ground had been hard and cloddy.
There have been slug attacks to developing crops sown in heavy, cloddy seed beds and in fields where oilseed rape has been grown previously, but these should recover if treated, provided that the wet weather does not persist.
If these soils are tilled when too wet in the spring, a rough cloddy seedbed will result.
Till at right angles to the wind, leaving the soil surface rough and cloddy (figure 18-29).
Soil structure 0 Soil is cloddy with big lumps, or powdery and dusty 2 Soil is lumpy and bakes hard when dry 4 Soil is crumbly and granular 5.
We have found that if we have a bed or garden area that is tight or cloddy, after a year of growing beans there it becomes rich and loose.
On the other hand, initially soil in untreated furrows was very dry, cloddy and porous which increased water intake until the pores became filled with sediment fines to form a soil seal coat (Brown et al.