inertia

(redirected from Clinical inertia)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for inertia

Synonyms for inertia

(physics) the tendency of a body to maintain its state of rest or uniform motion unless acted upon by an external force

References in periodicals archive ?
Their findings suggest that clinical inertia -- lack of physician action in the face of abnormal findings -- may be an important barrier to effective diabetes management.
Clinical Inertia in Hypertension -- Brigham and Women's
Our analysis enables us to identify which doctors are not intensifying therapy so that we can provide professional education and feedback to them, which has been shown in other studies to decrease clinical inertia and improve outcomes.
Two measures of clinical inertia in diabetes care have been used previously: the proportion of patients having an intensification of pharmacological therapy at visits with elevated measures of glycemic control (El-Kebbi et al.
We now develop a similar quality measure for measuring clinical inertia in diabetes care by evaluating the pharmacologic management of diabetes in patients with ready access to clinicians and medications through the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).
However, some technical aspects of the proposed measure of HbA1c-related clinical inertia require further attention.
Second, the authors propose that observed clinical inertia be interpreted in the context of "expected" likelihood of clinical inertia based on local practice patterns and patient characteristics.
The causes of this clinical inertia include a lack of formal training in obesity, inadequate counseling skills, lack of office tools and resources, lack of reimbursement, and brief office visits that focus on the acute symptoms of patients whose chief complaint typically is not "I am overweight.
Clinical inertia has been described with other conditions such as hypertension and hypercholesterolemia, as well as in aspects of diabetes care.
LDL close enough" was by far most common reason for clinical inertia.
Clinical inertia reigned, with many patients not getting their lipid-lowering therapy titrated up so that they could reach their LDL target.
Full browser ?