cliche

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  • noun

Synonyms for cliche

platitude

Synonyms for cliche

a trite expression or idea

Synonyms for cliche

a trite or obvious remark

References in periodicals archive ?
New statistics about the use of cliches in modern English are also included in the book .
Some cliches had a nub of meaning in their original contexts, but once these horses were out of the barn and running free in the spacious pastures of clichedom, the meaning was gone.
However, cliches can be a great way of getting a point across and helping people to understand what you mean.
Let's hope they don't bite off more than they can chew in turning back the tide of cliches.
But does anybody out there believe that if those same cliches were applied to a racial or other minority group the Sunday Express would still have printed them?
But there's always a very contemporary, unexpected and/or winningly revealing scene around the bend from every overacted cliche.
Six million original Cornish pasty and Ginsters slices packs have been printed with a well-known football cliche, which consumers then enter into the Ginsters website to see if they have won a prize.
With that in mind, I am going to abuse several cliches to make a point.
These are monographs that consciously build upon the important urban histories of the 1980s and 1990s, particularly Jackson's Crabgrass Frontier and Thomas Sugrue's 1996 study The Origins of the Urban Crisis, but that stand on their own as studies that expand the definition of the suburb well beyond suburban cliches and properly situate it is its metropolitan political context.
The man has fashioned a career out of locating or inventing a crude symbolic shorthand to explain and even popularize complex international phenomena while relying on a small cast of elites from politics, academia, and business to agree with his global cliches.
Here, Grimonprez's use of cliches results in an image that is both familiar and unprecedented.
In a recent discussion with a colleague, we went so far as to say that cliches are often, in a philosophical sense, important in society as they enable each culture to distinguish its values from those of other cultures.
Good writers avoid cliches like the plague, but you might be in hot water if someone asks, "Are you fair dinkum?
As the man who lampooned racial stereotypes in The Colored Museum and Bring in 'da Noise, Bring in 'da Funk, you must have been very aware that there were cliches you wanted to avoid with the character of Nanny.
You know that he knows these are cliches, but you also know that he knows that we all know we use these cliches to frame that which we have the most difficulty speaking of directly.