Clark's nutcracker

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  • noun

Synonyms for Clark's nutcracker

nutcracker of the western United States

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References in periodicals archive ?
Status of Clark's Nutcrackers on Cerro El Potosi, Nuevo Leon, Mexico.
Her research over time has focused on the ecological and evolutionary consequences of seed dispersal by Clark's nutcrackers to white-bark pine and other pine species.
Whitebark pine sits atop that ecosystem, serving as the anchor for high-alpine and watershed habitats and as food and shelter for species ranging from Clark's nutcracker to the grizzly bear.
Many animals have shown an ability to reach a desired location on the basis of its distance and direction from a stable landmark, but Clark's nutcrackers navigate according to abstract geometric relationships between pairs of moving landmarks, Kamil and Jones assert.
Balda started studying pinyon jays and Clark's nutcrackers in the late 1960s.
Instead, these pines have evolved a mutualistic partnership with a bird at home in subalpine forests, the Clark's nutcracker.
The prized seeds are picked and stashed by red squirrels in some habitats, but more commonly, whitebark seeds are the domain of Clark's nutcracker.
The pinyons of the Southwest (singleleaf, two-leaf, Parry, border, Mexican, and papershell) have wingless, heavy seeds full of fat and protein, which are eaten by western scrub, Steller's, and pinyon jays, and a related bird called Clark's nutcracker.
Whitebark pine provides an important food source for grizzlies, Clark's nutcracker, and red squirrels (See "Stalwart Species," American Forests, Summer 2002.
Whitebark pine relies on the jay-sized Clark's nutcracker to help it release those prized nuts.
Everyday people who live in or near whitebark pine territory can help the cause by taking photographs and writing down observations about the changing health of high-altitude forests and the prevalence of Clark's nutcrackers, red squirrels and grizzly bears, each of which depends on the trees for sustenance.
Earlier tests looked for a version of mental number lines in animals by showing lines of objects to rhesus macaques, chickens and seed-caching birds called Clark's nutcrackers.
Arrive early to spy snow buntings and Clark's nutcrackers among the stunted limber pines; look for fox, coyote, and pygmy rabbit tracks in the snow.
In laboratory tests, birds called Clark's nutcrackers have recalled where they buried something 9 months earlier.