Sir Christopher Wren

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  • noun

Synonyms for Sir Christopher Wren

English architect who designed more than fifty London churches (1632-1723)


References in periodicals archive ?
Christopher Wren has not been too severely treated for that lengthand-three-quarters verdict and clearly enjoys competing in demanding conditions.
Christopher Wren cost a not inconsiderable pounds 178,000 at Brightwells last October and he can start to repay a little of that price tag with victory at Leicester.
He reminded those gathered that 17th century British architect Christopher Wren faced similar challenges.
mong those who have left their mark in the stones is "Wren" - thought to be Sir Christopher Wren, the architect who designed London's St Paul's Cathedral.
AFTER THE GREAT FIRE OF 1666, England's leading architect, Sir Christopher Wren, made a plan for rebuilding London.
In 1684, astronomer Edmund Halley and architect Sir Christopher Wren were wrestling with a mathematical proof for explaining planetary orbits.
He then weaves the tale of Willis' rise from boy of modest beginnings to accomplished physician sharing the company of some the world's most noted thinkers, including Christopher Wren, Richard Lower, and Robert Hooke.
Other wills that can be found on the web site include those of Sir Francis Drake, Sir Christopher Wren and Jane Austen.
Let us observe that in the history of the Scientific Revolution we see Copernicuses, Galileos, Keplers, and Newtons on the one hand, but also Leonardo da Vincis, Michaelangelos, Shakespeares, John Donnes, and the likes of the architect of Saint Paul's Cathedral, Christopher Wren, on the other.
But he was not alone, for this astonishing 17th-century group who were the original members of the Royal Society included Christopher Wren, celebrated as an architect but much, much more than that.
A rotunda intended as a monument to Charles I was, in fact, designed by Christopher Wren in about 1678, but its construction was never undertaken, perhaps, as Potter says, because Charles II's relations with Parliament deteriorated.
Paul's Cathedral in London, on the inconspicuous tomb of its architect, Christopher Wren, are engraved the words Si monumentum requiris, circumspice- roughly, "If you would seek his monument, look around you.
It has Britain's grandest collection of 16th and 17th Century buildings and none is more splendid than the Royal Naval College, built by Sir Christopher Wren as a hospital.
Christopher Wren, GSA Program Director of the Seat Program Office said: "Some would measure this effort in terms of its size, I measure this award in terms of its groundbreaking impact - the first Task Order in the DoD Community.