Cultural Revolution

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Related to China's cultural revolution: Great Leap Forward, Prague Spring
  • noun

Synonyms for Cultural Revolution

a radical reform in China initiated by Mao Zedong in 1965 and carried out largely by the Red Guard

References in periodicals archive ?
During China's Cultural Revolution of the 1960s and '70s, Mao Zedong's wife, Jiang Qing, took control of the ``cultural'' part.
Traditional beliefs, such as fear of the number 4, were discouraged during Communist China's Cultural Revolution but are now making a comeback, Shen says.
On the plus side, there were some genuinely powerful photographs: Lucinda Devlin's images of US prison execution chambers and devices, Hai Bo's before-and-after re-creations of souvenir photos from China's Cultural Revolution, and Swiss photojournalist Arnold Odermatt's shots of car crashes.
In ''One Man's Bible,'' Gao recounts his experiences as a political activist, victim and outside observer during China's Cultural revolution.
In 1997 she visited the US to launch her own international business: DAUGHTER OF THE YELLOW RIVER: AN INSPIRATIONAL JOURNEY FROM DEPRIVED CHILD DURING CHINA'S CULTURAL REVOLUTION TO SUCCESSFUL GLOBAL ENTREPRENEUR recounts her long struggle.
SHE didn't see her husband, Liu Shaqi, after he was taken prisoner by the Red Guards of China's Cultural Revolution in 1967 and left in an unheated room.
Li, the middle of three brothers, was born in 1964, at the start of China's Cultural Revolution.
This is the second volume of the author's People's Trilogy; a third volume is planned on China's Cultural Revolution.
With 14 bodies of work by 14 artists cut from deep in the ruptured seams of apartheid South Africa, China's Cultural Revolution, Iran's Islamic Revolution, the fall of the Berlin Wall, the collapse of the Soviet Union and the devastating push and pull of Cold War politics in Central and South America, the show is a knockout, even if it skirts around its many possible subjects and never quite coheres along a common theme.
This autobiographical story by a Toronto-based theatre designer, animator and illustrator tells the story of China's Cultural Revolution and a young boy's quest to find his place in the world.
China's Cultural Revolution was madness: children turned against parents; public denuciations the order of the day; intellectuals beaten for the crime of being "too civilized.
A Thousand Years" revolved around a 40-year-old woman who grew up during China's Cultural Revolution and is devastated by what her family had to go through.
I Have No Color" is the author's tale of growing up in China's Cultural Revolution headed by communist leader Mao Zedong.
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