Chicano

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  • noun

Words related to Chicano

a person of Mexican descent

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References in periodicals archive ?
On June 9, further evidence of Latino cultural influence came in the announcement by the Library of Congress that the new poet laureate of the United States is Chicano, or Mexican-American, poet Juan Felipe Herrera from Fresno, Calif.
Aztlan is not deployed to imagine a community of struggle but rather a signifier of the "imminent danger" Chicanos, Mexicanos, and the recognition of difference pose to nostalgic renderings of a homogenized America.
Sagrado: A Photopoetics across the Chicano Homeland.
As but one more example, the old school Chicano/a movement has influenced la nueva onda Xicanismo; and new Xicanas/os are influencing old school Chicanos.
There is particular focus on films that offer alternatives to the over-representation of Chicanos as members of gangs.
The primacy of the indigenous perspective within its own milieu challenges the concept of evidence based treatment imposed on indigenous populations, including Chicanos, on a daily basis.
Core members of the East Los Angeles Chicano collective Asco--Patssi Valdez, Gronk (Glugio Nicandro), Willie F.
Me insists that white Angelinos welcomed Mexican Americans in some situations while barring African Americans without any apparent protest from Chicanos.
In the case of Chicanos, if the social position within a racist/sexist/heterosexist/capitalist regime is intended to reproduce this population as an exploitable member of the working class, the Chicano male student who resists this performative act is negatively sanctioned.
Conditions could not have been much worse for a credit union whose members are involved in real estate construction and related fields," said Robin Romano, president/ CEO of Marisol, who has been serving as interim manager for the struggling Chicanos Por La Causa since last July.
OccupiedAmerica: A history of Chicanos (5' Edition).
suggests, Chicanos have historically constituted a "phantom culture" within American society -- largely unperceived, unrecognized, and uncredited by the mainstream.
29, 1970, thousands of Chicanos took to the streets of East Los Angeles to protest the Vietnam War and the disproportionate number of Chicanos dying in that conflict.
But I related to it especially because I was not Mexican but Nicaraguan, and all the political, social and geographic issues of Chicanos had a commonality with my issues and those of other Latino immigrants.
As Raymund Paredes states in his survey of Chicano literature, "Suarez's favorite Chicanos were not marginal men, but cultural hybrids who prided themselves in their ability to function successfully in two worlds" (Paredes "Special Feature" 93).