decomposition reaction

(redirected from Chemical decomposition)
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  • noun

Synonyms for decomposition reaction

(chemistry) separation of a substance into two or more substances that may differ from each other and from the original substance

References in periodicals archive ?
As described above, only quartzite sand has the strength and resistance to chemical decomposition required for use as a proppant.
The fuel sources will be converted into bioenergy through combustion and pyrolysis - the chemical decomposition of a condensed substance by heating - and have been carefully chosen to overcome the difficulties of competition with food resources inherent in many existing biomass energy chains.
As well as incineration, there is pyrolysis - chemical decomposition of organic materials without oxygen - and gasification, which can be used to convert plastic rich waste into a gas for use as a fuel.
They compound the problems of stone degradation by removing a protective cover (grime) that protects against chemical decomposition associated with hydrocarbon release in vehicle emissions.
Some advances in this area include A-D Strips produced by the Image Permanence Institute, which can be placed in enclosed spaces, such as drawers and boxes, to detect the presence of acetic acid, the primary indicator of "vinegar syndrome," or the chemical decomposition of cellulose acetate film bases (Image Permanence Institute, 2002a).
Pyrolysis is the chemical decomposition of solid fuel at elevated temperatures to produce a combustible gas mixture.
In understandable though hardly dumbed-down terms, preservation experts from the continent's top film archives (UCLA, Eastman House, the Museum of Modern Art, the Library of Congress) explain how chemical decomposition already has wiped out some 90 percent of silent movies and is reducing many of the later, color productions to pink mush.
Casadonte has, however, confirmed the usefulness of one rumored piece of advice: Store reeds in the refrigerator to slow both microbial growth and chemical decomposition.
However, FDA has become concerned about the high temperatures--over 400 F--generated locally by the susceptor, and about possible migration at such high temperatures of monomers, oligomers, plasticizers, or chemical decomposition products from the paper, plastic or adhesives into the food contents of the package.
Chemical decomposition of the blend is present at only slightly elevated temperatures and with minimal off-gassing.
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